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News stories tagged with "labor"

Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein
Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein

Undocumented farmworkers weigh benefits against risks

New York's farms employ about 60,000 people and no one knows how many of those workers are here illegally. According to one estimate, 70 percent of the state's agricultural workforce is undocumented.
Some stay for years, long enough to raise a family. But it's risky.  Go to full article
Hodson Hall, which houses North Country Community College's administration and several classrooms, in Saranac Lake. Photo: Chris Morris via <a href="http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com/">Adirondack Daily Enterprise</a>
Hodson Hall, which houses North Country Community College's administration and several classrooms, in Saranac Lake. Photo: Chris Morris via Adirondack Daily Enterprise

North Country Community College reaches deal with faculty union

North Country Community College has reached a new, five-year deal with the union that represents its faculty.

NCCC President Steve Tyrell presented on the new contract at Monday's Essex County Board of Supervisors meeting. Afterward, county lawmakers approved the deal unanimously.  Go to full article
Syracuse-area job losses. Infographic: <a href="http://www.brookings.edu/research/reports/2013/04/18-job-sprawl-kneebone">Brookings Institution report</a>
Syracuse-area job losses. Infographic: Brookings Institution report

Most upstate cities losing jobs

There's been a steady flow of jobs away from America's city downtowns for the first decade of this century. Some of upstate New York's cities are bucking the trend, but not all.  Go to full article
Graphic from VT human trafficking task force [http://www.ccvs.state.vt.us/nomoreslaves]
Graphic from VT human trafficking task force [http://www.ccvs.state.vt.us/nomoreslaves]

Joining forces to stop North Country human trafficking

Human trafficking is a growing problem across the country...including here in the North Country. Undocumented farmworkers can be threatened with deportation. Sex workers or foreign brides can be held against their will. Foreign students with visas to work at Adirondack tourism destinations are vulnerable.

Law enforcement and area not-for-profits are joining forces to stop human trafficking in the North Country. Representatives from Homeland Security, the state attorney general's office and labor department, and social service agencies from St. Lawrence, Jefferson, and Franklin counties met earlier this month at SUNY Potsdam. They were joined by not-for-profits that help immigrants, domestic violence victims, and other vulnerable people.

Renan Salgado is a human trafficking specialist with the Worker Justice Center of New York. He's organizing the North Country human trafficking task force. He spoke with David Sommerstein.  Go to full article
Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein
Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein

Schumer says immigration bill will help NY dairy farms

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer says a new bipartisan immigration deal will provide an economic boost to New York farms and the agriculture industry.

In a press release, Schumer says the bill will be especially helpful to dairy farms and fruit growers.  Go to full article
Recent college graduates are facing smaller and smaller wages. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/deanmeyers/3598159727/">Dean Meyers</a>, CC some rights reserved
Recent college graduates are facing smaller and smaller wages. Photo: Dean Meyers, CC some rights reserved

Salary prospects dim for class of '13

High-paying jobs will remain elusive for the class of 2013 as a slow economic recovery drags on, according to numbers tallied by an economic policy center.

The Economic Policy Institute crunched some data compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and found starting salaries for 21-24-year old demographic entering the labor force continue to be lower than they were a decade ago.  Go to full article
Aaron Calderon, Malik McKenzie, and Sabel Bong, of SUNY Canton, prepare to march down Main Street. Photo: David Sommerstein
Aaron Calderon, Malik McKenzie, and Sabel Bong, of SUNY Canton, prepare to march down Main Street. Photo: David Sommerstein

How human trafficking happens all around us

According to a study by Hofstra University, more than 11,000 people in New York State have been victims of human trafficking since 2000. They may have been sex workers, or forcibly employed at restaurants or factories or on farms.

They're among the estimated 27 million people who are victims of human trafficking worldwide.

Several organizations this week are drawing attention to what's often called modern-day slavery. The state Department of Labor has announced a new partnership with businesses to expose illegal labor trafficking.

A handful of students from SUNY Canton held a march yesterday to raise awareness of the issue.  Go to full article
Former state Department of Transportation engineer Mike Fayette holds a copy of the Aug. 30, 2012 issue of the <em>Enterprise</em>, which contained a story about DOT's response to Tropical Storm Irene that he was quoted in. The story prompted DOT to threaten to fire him for talking to the press without getting the necessary approval. Photo: Chris Knight, courtesy of <a href="http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com"><em>Adirondack Daily Enterprise</em></a>
Former state Department of Transportation engineer Mike Fayette holds a copy of the Aug. 30, 2012 issue of the Enterprise, which contained a story about DOT's response to Tropical Storm Irene that he was quoted in. The story prompted DOT to threaten to fire him for talking to the press without getting the necessary approval. Photo: Chris Knight, courtesy of Adirondack Daily Enterprise

DOT worker: punished for praise?

A 30-year state Department of Transportation employee said he was forced to retire for speaking to a newspaper reporter without approval from his agency's communications office.

Mike Fayette, DOT's top official in Essex County, said he was threatened with termination for talking to The Adirondack Daily Enterprise for a story in which he praised the DOT's response to Tropical Storm Irene. A version of the same story, also from reporter Chris Knight, ran on NCPR.

DOT officials are refusing to comment on Fayette's case. Some observers say it's just another sign of how Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration has worked to limit and control public information. Chris Knight is still following the story.  Go to full article
NYSUT President Dick Iannuzzi speaks to reporters in Albany about the case. Photo: El-Wise Noisette via NYSUT.org
NYSUT President Dick Iannuzzi speaks to reporters in Albany about the case. Photo: El-Wise Noisette via NYSUT.org

Why a NYS teachers' union is suing the state

The state's largest teachers union has filed a lawsuit against the state's property tax cap, arguing it's unconstitutional.

New York State United Teachers President Dick Iannuzzi says the cap, passed by Cuomo and the legislature in 2011, arbitrarily limits property tax increase to two percent, regardless of whether a school district is rich or poor. The lawsuit also charges that the tax cap violates the principle of one person one vote, because a supermajority of 60 percent of voters is required to override the cap.  Go to full article
Part of the area to be cleaned up by Perras Environmental Control.  Photo: David Sommerstein.
Part of the area to be cleaned up by Perras Environmental Control. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Massena firm wins GM cleanup bid

A local environmental firm was selected for the next cleanup phase of General Motors' contaminated site in Massena.  Go to full article

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