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News stories tagged with "lac-megantic"

A train of oil tankers. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/11072040@N08/6184231577/">Russ Allison Loar</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A train of oil tankers. Photo: Russ Allison Loar, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Local officials want more answers about rail-oil safety

At a meeting this week in Elizabethtown, in Essex County, Canadian Pacific refused to disclose its emergency response plan in case of a major rail tanker disaster on its line in the Champlain Valley.

According to the Plattsburgh Press-Republican, CP spokesman Randy Marsh cited security concerns in declining to tell local government leaders and first responders about the company's response plan.  Go to full article
A train in Casselton, North Dakota carrying crude oil derailed and exploded on Dec. 30, 2013. Photo: Ken Pawluk / Associated Press / latimes.com, via NTSB press release
A train in Casselton, North Dakota carrying crude oil derailed and exploded on Dec. 30, 2013. Photo: Ken Pawluk / Associated Press / latimes.com, via NTSB press release

U.S., Canada push for safer oil tankers on North Country rails

Late Friday, U.S. and Canadian agencies made an unprecedented joint call for tough new safety rules for train cars carrying crude oil. As David Sommerstein reports, the tankers in question roll through North Country towns where speed limits have recently been increased.  Go to full article
Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project.  Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left.  (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Eileen Simollardes (at right) from Vermont Gas outlines the pipeline project. Cornwall select board chairman Bruce Hiland (in blue) looks on at left. (Photo: Brian Mann)

NY-VT tension shapes Ticonderoga gas pipeline project

The US and Canada are carrying more and more energy produced in North America on rail tank cars. That's controversial, especially after this summer's disaster in Lac-Megantic.

But there's also a fierce debate underway over construction of new pipelines to carry the surge of domestic natural gas and oil. Much of the controversy has focused on the Keystone XL project in the Midwest. But we have our own pipeline battle shaping up here in the North Country.

A company in Vermont hopes to build a new line that would feed natural gas from Vermont underneath Lake Champlain to the International Paper mill in Ticonderoga. Some environmental activists and local government leaders in Vermont are promising to block the project unless major changes are made.  Go to full article
Federal officials in the US have raised concerns about the type of tanker car that erupted in Lac Megantic since at least 1991.  Photo: Brian Mann
Federal officials in the US have raised concerns about the type of tanker car that erupted in Lac Megantic since at least 1991. Photo: Brian Mann

Train tanker cars that exploded in Lac Megantic "inadequate"

It's been nearly three months since an American-operated tanker train derailed and exploded in the town of Lac Megantic in eastern Quebec. The Montreal-Maine and Atlantic train was carrying a cargo of crude oil and other chemicals from oil fields in North Dakota. The massive explosions that followed killed forty-seven people.

In the weeks after the disaster, it has become clear that the clean-up and recovery effort in Lac-Megantic will be far more costly and challenging than once believed. Also, investigators in the US and Canada now acknowledge that there were deep concerns about the safety of the tanker cars used by the railroad.

Those fears first surfaced decades before this deadly accident occurred. Brian Mann has our special report.  Go to full article
Federal officials in the US have raised concerns about the type of tanker car that erupted in Lac Megantic since at least 1991.  Photo: Brian Mann
Federal officials in the US have raised concerns about the type of tanker car that erupted in Lac Megantic since at least 1991. Photo: Brian Mann

Train tanker cars that exploded in Lac Megantic "inadequate"

It's been nearly three months since an American-operated tanker train derailed and exploded in the town of Lac Megantic in eastern Quebec. The Montreal-Maine and Atlantic train was carrying a cargo of crude oil and other chemicals from oil fields in North Dakota. The massive explosions that followed killed forty-seven people.

In the weeks after the disaster, it has become clear that the clean-up and recovery effort in Lac-Megantic will be far more costly and challenging than once believed. Also, investigators in the US and Canada now acknowledge that there were deep concerns about the safety of the tanker cars used by the railroad.

Those fears first surfaced decades before this deadly accident occurred. Brian Mann has our special report.  Go to full article
Lac-Megantic burning on the first day after the rail car derailment sent fireballs and streams of burning oil coursing through the Quebec village.  (Photo:  Surete du Quebec)
Lac-Megantic burning on the first day after the rail car derailment sent fireballs and streams of burning oil coursing through the Quebec village. (Photo: Surete du Quebec)

In Lac-Megantic, grief and resilience

Back in July, a massive tanker train filled with petroleum from North Dakota derailed in a tiny town in Quebec.
Explosions and fire ripped through the village, killing 47 people and destroying the downtown of Lac-Megantic.

Brian Mann has been covering the aftermath of that disaster for NPR and North Country Public Radio.

He was in Quebec on assignment again over the weekend. He joined Martha Foley on the line from NCPR's bureau in Saranac Lake.  Go to full article
Emergency service crews at work in the blast and fire zone of Lac-Megantic. Photo: Surete du Quebec
Emergency service crews at work in the blast and fire zone of Lac-Megantic. Photo: Surete du Quebec

Railway Exec speaks about Lac-Megantic disaster

The chairman of the American railway at the center of the deadly disaster in Quebec is speaking out about his company's struggles.

The Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway faces a barrage of investigations and lawsuits, following the explosion last month that authorities say left 47 people dead. One of the railroad's industrial trains rolled free, derailed and exploded in the heart of Lac-Megantic.

Ed Burkhardt, who lives in Chicago, is the chairman of the Montreal, Maine and Atlantic. He spoke in-depth with Brian Mann last week. Burkhardt spoke first about the fact that his company has so far failed to pay for expensive clean-up effort in the village.  Go to full article
The "red zone" in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. NCPR File Photo: Brian Mann
The "red zone" in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. NCPR File Photo: Brian Mann

Clean-up, controversy follow Lac-Megantic disaster

The criminal investigation continues in eastern Canada, three weeks after a train disaster that police now say killed 47 people.

An unmanned train full of oil rolled free, derailed and then exploded in the heart of Lac-Megantic, a small rural town about three hours east of Montreal.

Civil lawsuits are already being filed here in the US - and there's a fight brewing over who will pay for the massive cleanup.  Go to full article
Keeping vigil and keeping watch at St. Agnes Church in Lac-Megantic. Photo: Brian Mann
Keeping vigil and keeping watch at St. Agnes Church in Lac-Megantic. Photo: Brian Mann

In Lac-Megantic, first steps toward normal

The official death toll in Lac-Megantic Canada has risen to 35, following the deadly train explosion earlier this month that flattened a big part of the community's downtown.

Now the rural Canadian town is making its first, painful steps toward recovery.  Go to full article
Emergency service crews at work in the blast and fire zone of Lac-Mégantic. Photo: Sureté du Québec
Emergency service crews at work in the blast and fire zone of Lac-Mgantic. Photo: Suret du Qubec

On the scene of Lac-Megantic's tragic train wreck

All 50 people still missing after the explosive train wreck in Lac-Megantic, Quebec Saturday are now presumed dead. The Associated Press reports the CEO of the parent company that operates the train plans to meet with residents and the town's mayor today. He faced jeers when he visited the town yesterday.

NCPR's Brian Mann is in Lac-Megantic reporting for this station and NPR. He spoke Martha Foley this morning.  Go to full article

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