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News stories tagged with "lake-ontario"

A Coast Guard exercise on Lake Ontario last summer. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/coastguardnews/9368939664/">Coast Guard News</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A Coast Guard exercise on Lake Ontario last summer. Photo: Coast Guard News, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Marine security exercise set for Lake Ontario shore

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) The U.S. Coast Guard is joining local and Canadian law enforcement agencies for a two-day exercise being held this week from the eastern end of Lake Ontario to the Buffalo-Niagara region.  Go to full article
Brian Wood at the helm. Photo: David Sommerstein
Brian Wood at the helm. Photo: David Sommerstein

A peek inside Seaway master control

Several hundred giant freighters slip through the St. Lawrence Seaway every year. They're guided by vessel traffic controllers from a squat building on top of the Eisenhower Lock in Massena.

The master control room looks straight out of Star Trek. Half a dozen big flat screens show computerized displays of real-time traffic along the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario.

This "Heard Up North" feature first aired last June.  Go to full article
Green groups are hoping the new water levels plan improves wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf
Green groups are hoping the new water levels plan improves wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf

After decades, major breakthrough on water levels for Lake Ontario, St. Lawrence

Standing between Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River is a dam that a lot of people say operates under outdated rules.

The regulations for the Moses-Saunders Dam between Cornwall and Massena haven't changed since the 1950s. For over a decade, lawmakers and activists have said that the rules on water levels have harmed wetlands, fish and wildlife, and even the tourism economy.

They've tried and failed to find a way of reversing that damage. Last year, officials came up with a new concept, called Plan 2014. Yesterday the International Joint Commission unanimously endorsed it.  Go to full article
Summer life aboard the 72-foot brigantine <i>St. Lawrence II</i>, a training vessel out of Kingston, Ontario.  Photo:  Brigantine, Inc.
Summer life aboard the 72-foot brigantine St. Lawrence II, a training vessel out of Kingston, Ontario. Photo: Brigantine, Inc.

How a tall ship can teach sailing and life skills

Since the early 1950s, the Kingston, Ontario-based St. Lawrence II has set sail on Lake Ontario and along the St. Lawrence River. The tall ship is a sail-training vessel for teens that will spend much of its time this summer as the star attraction in War of 1812 commemorations. It'll be in Cape Vincent as part of the annual French Festival next month.

Dave More is education director for Brigantine, Inc., the group out of Kingston that runs the summer sail-training program. He told Todd Moe that serving aboard the 72-foot brigantine St. Lawrence II is more than hoisting sails and swabbing decks. More says the program celebrated its 60th anniversary last summer.  Go to full article
A Willow Ptarmigan along eastern Lake Ontario. The sighting this week is a first for New York State.  Photo: Jeff Bolsinger.
A Willow Ptarmigan along eastern Lake Ontario. The sighting this week is a first for New York State. Photo: Jeff Bolsinger.

Willow Ptarmigan becomes an avian celebrity near Watertown

Carloads of birders from across the region have visited the shore of Lake Ontario, near Watertown, over the last few days hoping to glimpse a rare avian visitor from the Arctic tundra.

Late last week, Eugene Nichols was birding near Point Peninsula and found an all white bird that didn't belong in northern New York. Nichols contacted Jeff Bolsinger, a bird biologist at Fort Drum, who confirmed that it's a Willow Ptarmigan. Bolsinger says the bird normally lives only in northern Canada and Alaska. He says the sighting this week is the first documented sighting of a Willow Ptarmigan in New York State, and the second recorded in the lower 48 states in a century.

Bolsinger told Todd Moe he's not sure how the bird ended up this far south, but it's become an instant celebrity in the birding community.  Go to full article
Since 1978, Richard Feltoe has reenacted a Canadian militia soldier from the War of 1812.  His topic at the War of 1812 Heritage Talks is The Upper Canada Militia in Peace and War, 1808-1816.  Photo: Richard Feltoe
Since 1978, Richard Feltoe has reenacted a Canadian militia soldier from the War of 1812. His topic at the War of 1812 Heritage Talks is The Upper Canada Militia in Peace and War, 1808-1816. Photo: Richard Feltoe

Ogdensburg explores War of 1812 history, heroes and everyday life

Battle reenactments, tours, exhibits and other events are set for this year's commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The U.S. and Britain fought some of the war's bloodiest battles two centuries ago this year in Ontario and parts of upstate New York from Lake Ontario to Lake Champlain.

This weekend, the Fort La Presentation Association in Ogdensburg presents its annual War of 1812 Heritage Talks at the Freight House restaurant. Todd Moe spoke with historian and organizer Michael Whittaker, who says it's two days of traditional music and a slate of speakers and exhibits.  Go to full article
Fishing the Salmon River, one of the Lake Ontario tributaries stocked by the DEC. Photo: David Chanatry, New York Reporting Project
Fishing the Salmon River, one of the Lake Ontario tributaries stocked by the DEC. Photo: David Chanatry, New York Reporting Project

Lake Ontario sport fishery is a $110M business

A successful stocking program has led Lake Ontario to be one of the premier fishing destinations in the Great Lakes.

The Department of Environmental Conservation pumps trout and salmon into the lake each year. That brings out more than 2.5 million anglers to the lake and its tributaries.  Go to full article
Culture of clostridium botulinum, which produces the botulism toxins. Photo courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory. Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.
Culture of clostridium botulinum, which produces the botulism toxins. Photo courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory. Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.

Botulism kills hundreds of loons in Lake Ontario

Type E Botulism, a disease caused by a toxic bacteria, is back in Lake Ontario. And over the last month or so, it's killed several hundred loons, ducks and other birds.

Type E Botulism has triggered annual bird kills in several Great Lakes since the late 1990s. But they've been largely minor on Lake Ontario for the last seven years. That is until residents around Henderson Harbor and Ellisburg in Jefferson County started calling the DEC in late October.  Go to full article

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