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News stories tagged with "lake-ontario"

Invasives destroying Great Lakes food chain

Although zebra mussels have been affecting the ecology of the Great Lakes since they were first found in 1988, researchers are continuously surprised at how much damage they've caused. Now, biologists are wondering if zebra mussels and the more recently arrived quagga mussels are to blame for a collapse of the fishery in one of North America's largest lakes. The Environment Report's Lester Graham reports the researchers are also wondering if this collapse is a preview of what will happen to all of the Great Lakes.  Go to full article
The American eel
The American eel

Eel release "grand experiment"

Biologists in Canada are taking extreme measures to prevent the disappearance of a mysterious and fascinating fish. For the first time ever, they've stocked the St. Lawrence River with 144,000 American eels. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Eels disappear from Lake Ontario

Few species illustrate the consequences of the complex threats to the Great Lakes system as the American eel. Only 50 years ago, the snake-like fish accounted for half the biomass of Lake Ontario. Today, it's all but gone. David Sommerstein reports. (This story was part of The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's series on Ten Threats to the Great Lakes.)  Go to full article

Virus Killing More Fish in Lake Ontario?

Thousands more dead fish are washing up on the shore of eastern Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. Biologists and local businesses are concerned because many different species are being killed. As David Sommerstein reports, a new virus may be causing the die-off.  Go to full article

Water Levels Study: The Envelope, Please

A 5-year, $20 million study of water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River was finished last week. It's a collaboration between the U.S. and Canada. It's the first time the system has been reviewed since the 1960s. The study recommends three options for holding and releasing water downriver. David Sommerstein explains.  Go to full article

Virus Threatens River Muskies

Biologists are concerned a new fish virus may become an ongoing threat in the St. Lawrence River. DEC officials have confirmed Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, or VHS, killed hundreds of round gobies, an invasive species, last month near Cape Vincent. The virus also killed 18 muskies, a prized native fish in the St. Lawrence. The DEC says it hasn't affected river trout or salmon populations so far. David Sommerstein spoke with John Farrell. Farrell directs SUNY ESF's Thousand Islands Biological Station near Clayton. He says the virus is common in Europe and Japan, and in saltwater in the Pacific Northwest. It first showed up in the Great Lakes watershed last year, in the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario.  Go to full article
Prairie Smoke in bloom on the Chaumont Barrens
Prairie Smoke in bloom on the Chaumont Barrens

Chaumont Barrens: The North Country's Prairie

If you're looking for a unique hike in the North Country, try this. Tucked in the northwest corner of Jefferson County, just inland from Lake Ontario, there's an area that's more North Dakota prairie than northern New York forest. It's called the Chaumont Barrens. It's owned by the Nature Conservancy. It's the only "alvar" landscape in New York State. And best of all, its wildflowers are in full bloom right now. David Sommerstein took a nature walk and sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

Round Goby Die-Off May Be Viral

Environmental officials say a disease might be killing an invasive species of fish in eastern Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River. Tests have ruled out botulism. Scientists say the disease may be a virus. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Botulism Killing Birds on St. Lawrence, Lake Ontario

State environment officials are investigating the deaths of sea birds in the Thousand Islands area of the St. Lawrence River and along the shore of Lake Ontario. The DEC says bird carcasses tested earlier this month showed contamination with type E botulism. As Brian Mann reports, the disease can harm humans who eat birds of fish poisoned with the toxin.  Go to full article

What Is Liquid Manure?

Following the 3 million-gallon liquid manure spill in the Black River last week, we wanted to know why farmers use liquid manure in the first place. So David Sommerstein called Brent Buchanan of the Cornell Cooperatve Extension of St. Lawrence County. He says in the old days on dairy farms, each milking cow had its own stall with its own bedding.  Go to full article

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