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News stories tagged with "lake-placid"

The Palace Theatre in Lake Placid hosts the <i>Go Digital or Go Dark</i> event, Friday from 5-6:15 pm.  Photo:  ANCA
The Palace Theatre in Lake Placid hosts the Go Digital or Go Dark event, Friday from 5-6:15 pm. Photo: ANCA

Small theaters struggle in the digital age

The movie world is changing the way it makes films. Hollywood studios are going digital and later this year will no longer release films on film. Movie projectors are disappearing during this digital revolution. For most small theaters, the price to upgrade to digital equipment can be staggering, and the change is putting many in a very difficult financial situation -- upgrade costs are as high as $100,000.

The Adirondack Film Society and Adirondack North Country Association are kicking off a campaign Friday night at the Palace Theatre in Lake Placid to raise money to help local theaters complete the digital upgrades needed to continue to operate. Todd Moe has more on the Go Digital or Go Dark world premiere.  Go to full article
A huge crowd sets out in silence for the first half-mile of Lake Placid's Boston Strong tribute run Monday night. The event was held to honor and show support for the victims of last week's Boston Marathon bombings. Photo: Chris Morris via <a href="http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com/">Adirondack Daily Enterprise</a>
A huge crowd sets out in silence for the first half-mile of Lake Placid's Boston Strong tribute run Monday night. The event was held to honor and show support for the victims of last week's Boston Marathon bombings. Photo: Chris Morris via Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Lake Placid run honors Boston

Hundreds of people circled Lake Placid's Mirror Lake Monday night to raise money for the victims of last week's Boston Marathon bombings, and to show their support for a city still reeling from the deadly attacks.

Among the 500 or so people who ran, walked and biked around the lake in the Boston Strong tribute were three Lake Placid residents who ran in last week's marathon.  Go to full article
Parmelee Tolkan's <i>Caged Bird</i> is part of the new exhibit,  <i>The Past Through The Eyes Of The Present</i>, on display at the LPCA Fine Arts Gallery through April 12.  Photo: LPCA
Parmelee Tolkan's Caged Bird is part of the new exhibit, The Past Through The Eyes Of The Present, on display at the LPCA Fine Arts Gallery through April 12. Photo: LPCA

How old photos inspired new Adirondack art

More than two-dozen glass plate negatives from a century ago have been re-imagined by a group of Adirondack artists in a new exhibit at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts. The show, The Past Through The Eyes Of The Present, is a collaboration with The Lake Placid-North Elba Historical Society. The two organizations asked thirty modern artists to search through the images, choose one and recreate it.

More than 8,000 glass plate negatives were rescued by Dr. George Hart from destruction in the 1970s. Now known as the Barry Collection, the glass plates depict life in the Adirondacks: sports, families and wildlife. The collection was gifted to the Lake Placid Center for the Arts, where it has remained until this show. Now the LPCA is passing it along for safe keeping to the Historical Society.

Todd Moe toured the exhibit with James Lemons, executive director of the Lake Placid Center for the Arts, and Parmelee Tolkan, one of the artists in the show who is also vice president of the Lake Placid-North Elba Historical Society. Tolkan says part of the goal of the exhibit is to introduce the antique images to the public.  Go to full article
James Lemons. Photo: LPCA
James Lemons. Photo: LPCA

LPCA's new leader to build on past arts successes

The Lake Placid Center for the Arts's new Executive Director has been on the job for about a month. James Lemons was hired in December to replace outgoing Executive Director Nadine Duhaime, who led the organization for more than 25 years.

In a press release last month, Nancy Rosenthal, Board President said, "This is a bittersweet time. It's difficult to let Nadine go, yet exciting to bring James on board. We are confident that the LPCA will continue to flourish under new leadership."

Lemons told Todd Moe he's excited to join both the LPCA and the Lake Placid community. He was General Manager of the Florida Studio Theatre in Sarasota, before accepting the job in Lake Placid. Before Florida, he was active in professional theater in Texas for about ten years.  Go to full article
The crowd at a Wild & Scenic Film Festival event in California. Photo: Wild & Scenic Film Fest
The crowd at a Wild & Scenic Film Festival event in California. Photo: Wild & Scenic Film Fest

Preview: Wild & Scenic Film Festival

The new director's cut of the local Adirondack film, Small Farm Rising, will be shown at the Wild & Scenic Film Festival in Lake Placid this weekend. The 10th annual festival, hosted by the Placid Lake Foundation, will be held at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts on Friday and Saturday. Todd Moe talks with Placid Lake Foundation Executive Director Christian Weber, who says the film series is the largest environmental film festival in North America.  Go to full article
View of Lake Placid from the summit of Little Whiteface Mountain.  For more information about <i>A Place to Dream</i>, call 518-523-1312.  (photo: Giggy)
View of Lake Placid from the summit of Little Whiteface Mountain. For more information about A Place to Dream, call 518-523-1312. (photo: Giggy)

Preview: "A Place to Dream" in Lake Placid

NCPR is media sponsor for Adirondacks: A Place to Dream, a three-day event in Lake Placid this weekend. Arts and cultural organizations from throughout the region will gather to explore the power of place that, for more than 150 years, has drawn some of the world's greatest artists, photographers, musicians, filmmakers and writers to the mountains. The multi-media weekend will include some of the most important voices in the Adirondack arts and culture community.

Todd Moe talks with Gary Smith, one of the co-organizers of the event, who says the free series of lectures and conversations will cover music, art, storytelling, writing, films and photography.  Go to full article

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A police helicopter searches for Seth Kilburn over Lake Placid Wednesday. Photo: Richard Rosentreter, Courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise.
A police helicopter searches for Seth Kilburn over Lake Placid Wednesday. Photo: Richard Rosentreter, Courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise.

Police believe Lake Placid man's death accidental

The body of a Lake Placid man who had been missing since early last week has been found on a neighborhood pathway between the bar where he was last seen and his home.

Lake Placid police Chief Bill Moore says 34-year-old Seth A. Kilburn's body was located at about 10 a.m. Friday near a residence on McKinley Street.

An autopsy was scheduled to take place Friday in Saranac Lake. Police believe the death was accidental.  Go to full article

Search Continues for Seth Kilburn, missing from Lake Placid since Sunday

A search is underway for a Lake Placid man who was last seen early Sunday morning.

Lake Placid village police are seeking the public's help as they look for 34-year-old Seth A. Kilburn. He was last seen leaving Wiseguys bar on School Street in the village of Lake Placid between 12:30 and 1 a.m. Sunday.  Go to full article
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.
Jackie Altman paints "en plein air" near Lake Placid.

Art that conveys a sense of immediacy

Many Adirondack artists will tell you that our region offers nearly all the elements a landscape painter looks for - mountains, trees, waterways and ever-changing hues of green, gray and blue. You'll find dozens of artists outdoors this week in the Adirondacks painting "plein air" during Saranac Lake's Fourth Annual Plein Air Festival, part of the "Great Adirondack Days" celebration.

It's a time-honored tradition, particularly by artists who want to convey a sense of immediacy. They'll find a spot with a great view of a mountain or along a stream, prop up an easel and paint just as they see it. Most works are completed within hours on the spot. Spontaneity is key. Bugs, rain and fleeting sunlight are challenges.

Last summer, Todd Moe tagged along when Lake Placid artist Jackie Altman returned to a favorite spot with views of some of the High Peaks.  Go to full article

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