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News stories tagged with "land-claim"

The six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy c. 1720. Graphic: <a href=" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Iroquois_6_Nations_map_c1720.png">Nonenmacher</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
The six nations of the Iroquois Confederacy c. 1720. Graphic: Nonenmacher, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Onondaga land claim will go to OAS human rights commission

The Onondaga Indian Nation has brought its decade old land claim case to an international human rights commission.

A lawsuit first filed in 2005 argues land was illegally taken from the Onondagas in the 18th and 19th centuries. The U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear an appeal in October.  Go to full article
Akwesasne Mohawk casino. Photo: David Sommerstein
Akwesasne Mohawk casino. Photo: David Sommerstein

What the Mohawk casino deal means for the North Country

Mohawk tribal chiefs joined Governor Cuomo in Albany yesterday to announce a new deal on casino exclusivity.

They signed off on settling a long-running dispute over revenues from the Mohawks' Akwesasne Casino near Massena. In return, the Mohawks will get exclusive gaming rights in the 8-county North Country region.

David Sommerstein joined Martha Foley to sort out what the deal means for the North Country and the Mohawk land claim.  Go to full article
St. Regis Mohawk tribal chiefs and North Country leaders with Governor Cuomo Tuesday in Albany.
St. Regis Mohawk tribal chiefs and North Country leaders with Governor Cuomo Tuesday in Albany.

Mohawks ink gaming exclusivity deal for North Country

Fresh off a deal with the Oneida Nation, Governor Cuomo stood with chiefs of the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe this afternoon to announced a deal to resolve gaming issues that affect the North Country.  Go to full article

U.S. defends Mohawk land claim

The U.S. Attorney General's office is defending the St. Regis Mohawks' land claim in its entirety. That's after a judge recommended throwing out most of it last fall.

In a brief filed earlier in November, Assistant Attorney General Ignacia Moreno made two important points about the decades old Mohawk claim to 12,000 acres in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties.  Go to full article
The Hogansburg Triangle is in pink on this map.
The Hogansburg Triangle is in pink on this map.

Judge sustains part of Mohawk land claim

Native tribes' claims to ancestral lands in New York haven't fared so well recently. In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court essentially dismissed the Oneida Nation's land claim, saying too much time had passed since the 18th century treaties the claims are based on. Other courts have followed that ruling with other tribes' land claims.

So this week, when a judge recommended throwing out 85% of the Mohawk land claim in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe focused on the 15% that has a chance to survive. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Disputed terrain?  A photograph of the Raquette Lake Hotel taken by Seneca Ray Stoddard in 1889.  Land disputes in the area date from that era.
Disputed terrain? A photograph of the Raquette Lake Hotel taken by Seneca Ray Stoddard in 1889. Land disputes in the area date from that era.

Can Albany settle the century-old Raquette Lake land dispute?

This weekend in the Hamilton County community of Raquette Lake, landowners will gather to hear a proposal that could change New York state's constitution.

For generations, their community has been in conflict with the state over land claims affecting more than 200 parcels. Locals and seasonal residents say the property is privately owned.

But state officials, and some environmental groups, have argued that much of the land is actually part of the state forest preserve and should be kept "forever wild."

As Brian Mann reports, this is the latest effort to sort out one of the Adirondack Park's oldest and thorniest disputes.  Go to full article

Oneidas turn to federal trust in land claim fight

Three years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the Oneida Nation's claim to land in the central New York town of Sherill. It was considered a blow to native efforts to reclaim territory lost in the 1700s, including land claimed by the Akwesasne Mohawks in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties. The ruling was especially troubling for the Oneidas, because the land in question includes their lucrative Turning Stone casino and resort. The Oneidas are now taking a different tack. They're asking the federal government to put 13,000 acres into the native trust. That would make it sovereign territory, and part of the Oneida reservation. The town of Oneida, some citizen groups, and the State of New York are trying to block the trust in federal court. David Chanatry reports. This story was first produced for the NPR program Day to Day.  Go to full article

St. Lawrence Exits Mohawk Claim Deal

The St. Lawrence County legislature voted unanimously Monday to withdraw its support from the Mohawk land claim. It's the latest blow to the Akwesasne Mohawks' drive for compensation for lands New York took illegally in the 1700s. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Supreme Court Refuses To Hear Case, Cayuga Land Claim Dismissed

State officials are celebrating the US Supreme Court's refusal to review a Cayuga land claim appeal. US Senator Chuck Shumer called it a "major victory" for local taxpayers, and Governor Pataki issued a statement praising the decision to - quote - "definitively end the tribal land claims that have threatened our state's homeowners and businesses."
But what implication the ruling has for the Akwesasne Mohawk land claim in St Lawrence and Franklin counties isn't clear. And both sides are urging a go slow approach. Gregory Warner reports.  Go to full article

Brasher Exits Mohawk Land Claim Deal

The deal to settle the 23-year-old Mohawk land claim has hit another stumbling block. Last week, the town of Brasher voted to withdraw from the settlement. That's a problem because almost a quarter of land offered the Mohawks is in Brasher. The St. Lawrence and Franklin County legislatures plan to meet in joint session to discuss the land claim next week. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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