Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "landscape"

Gardeners: ready, set...prune!

Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley it's time to get the pruning saw and clipper out. And she has advice on what to do first.  Go to full article
Nancie Battaglia with her photograph of <em>One Square Mile of Hope</em>.
Nancie Battaglia with her photograph of One Square Mile of Hope.

Preview: Adirondack View Finders in Old Forge

Todd Moe talks with Linda Weal, curator of the newest exhibit at View in Old Forge. The show, Adirondack View Finders, is on display through early March and includes dozens of photographs from four of the most celebrated photographers in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article
SLU grounds manager Marcus Sherburne stands by a new "no-mow" zone.  Inside the white line, they'll stop mowing, savings thousands of gallons of gasoline.
SLU grounds manager Marcus Sherburne stands by a new "no-mow" zone. Inside the white line, they'll stop mowing, savings thousands of gallons of gasoline.

SLU groundskeeping goes green

In the ultra-competitive world of college admissions, a university can live or die by how it looks. The grounds are a huge part of sealing the deal for prospective students and parents. But universities are also trying to save money and reduce their impact on the environment. Tonight at 7, St. Lawrence University hosts a discussion about sustainable groundskeeping. One of the featured speakers is SLU grounds manager, Marcus Sherburne. Sherburne has sculpted golf courses and universities for more than a decade. In the last few years, he's begun changing his practices to reduce energy and use less pesticides and fertilizers. Sherburne took David Sommerstein for a ride in his four-wheeler to show him the difference.  Go to full article

Landscape chores...ASAP

Mid-March. Maple syrup season, pussy willows, snowmelt, creeks rising, geese in the air, skunks in the compost, crocuses blooming... There are lots of signs that spring is getting closer. Our photos of the day have been all about early spring this week. And as Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley, it could be the perfect time to get the shovel out for some serious landscape revisions.  Go to full article

Bringing more light to the early darkness

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about autumn and winter decorations. Bringing delights from the outdoors inside, and brightening the early nights.  Go to full article

Some hard choices for landscapers

Have you found a perennial or tree in the wrong spot in the backyard? Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy discuss keeping a critical eye on landscaping.  Go to full article
Four views from four times and one shoreline, Lake Tenaya,  2002, Mark Klett and Byron Wolfe.
Four views from four times and one shoreline, Lake Tenaya, 2002, Mark Klett and Byron Wolfe.

Time Studies: Photographs By Mark Klett

Mark Klett has been photographing the American West for about 30 years. Klett is a 1974 graduate of St. Lawrence University. He was a geology major, so he approaches his work as an artist, and a scientist. In the late 70s, he directed the Rephotographic Survey Project. He and his team revisited and rephotographed places first captured during surveys of the West in the late 19th century.
Last year, he published "Yosemite in Time" with photographer Byron Wolfe and writer Rebecca Solnit. They photographed some of these iconic landscapes yet again. They wanted to understand how well-known photographs have guided our interpretations of the land, and the concept of wilderness. They were thinking about time, too, and wondered how they might visualize the relationship between change and time. Some of their panoramas are now up at St. Lawrence University. The show is called Time Studies. It also includes images exposed over periods ranging from 10 minutes to two days.
The panoramas incorporate classic and historic photographs . They stretch out the view, the space, and the time. You see a 19th century image, stitched to a series of Klett's and Wolfe's frames, overlaid with one of Ansel Adams' famous photographs of Yosemite. Collage-like.
Martha Foley met with Mark Klett in the gallery. She asked him why just taking "retty" pictures isn't enough:  Go to full article

Planting? Now?

Gardeners and landscapers who still have the itch can try... Horticulturist Amy Ivy has words of advice, and caution.  Go to full article

Autumn Leaves: Landscaping in the Fall, part 2

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about autumn landscaping. Shubbery and berries come into their own this time of year. And comments from a listener.  Go to full article

1-9 of 9