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News stories tagged with "late-blight"

Potato late blight lesion.  Photo: http://usablight.org/Jean Ristaino, NC State University.
Potato late blight lesion. Photo: http://usablight.org/Jean Ristaino, NC State University.

Late blight prevention and identification

The cloudy, rainy conditions last month were ideal for the spread of late blight spores. Late blight is a plant disease that attacks potatoes and tomatoes. It has not been confirmed in the North Country, but has been found on a tomato plant in Oneida County. Amy Ivy, horticulturist with Cornell Cooperative Extension in Clinton and Essex Counties, says tomato and potato growers in the region should take action. There's no cure for inflected plants, but there are ways to prevent its spread.  Go to full article
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.

Late blight confirmed in St. Lawrence County

Tomato and potato growers beware. Cornell Cooperative Extension has confirmed the first case of late blight in St. Lawrence County.  Go to full article
A still life from the garden of Darlene Kelley... last year
A still life from the garden of Darlene Kelley... last year

Last call for planting

Got a little space left in the garden? Cornell Cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy says there's still time -- just -- to plant summer crops like bush beans and zucchini. She has advice on pruning tomatoes now, and an update on late blight, which has been confirmed on Long Island. And Amy tells Martha Foley she's starting cosmos and zinnias now, too.  Go to full article

Keeping tomato plants under control mid-summer

The tomato plants in the garden are growing like they're never going to stop - and if it weren't for frost, they probably wouldn't. Martha Foley talks with horticulturalist Amy Ivy of the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Clinton and Essex counties about caring for tomato plants mid-summer, including early blight, late blight and when to pinch off new blossoms and green growth.  Go to full article
Horticulturist Amy Ivy
Horticulturist Amy Ivy

Late blight vs. early blight, explained

Growers are nervous this summer as they hope late blight won't resurface in the North Country. The disease devastated tomato and potato crops across the Northeast last summer. David Sommerstein talks with Amy Ivy, horticulturalist for the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Clinton and Essex counties, for the latest on late blight. She says gardeners are confusing the disease with early blight and other, more common, diseases.  Go to full article

Vegetable gardeners on the look-out for a return of late blight

It was in the 80s and 90s across the North Country this past weekend. Some eager gardeners were no doubt out in the vegetable patch, planting the earliest of early crops, like spinach and peas. It won't be long till the planting season is underway in earnest. And there's an important question lingering from last year: what about late blight?

Horticulturist Amy Ivy assures Martha Foley there are no worries about tomatoes carrying the disease over the winter, but potatoes are another story.  Go to full article
The blight hitting tomatoes is the same blight responsible for the Irish potato famine in the mid-19 century.  (Photo courtesy of Cornell University)
The blight hitting tomatoes is the same blight responsible for the Irish potato famine in the mid-19 century. (Photo courtesy of Cornell University)

Tomato blight spreading

One of the quintessential tastes of late summer, a juicy, perfectly ripe garden tomato, is hard to come by this year. This year a tomato blight swept across the Northeast and it's moving into Midwestern gardens and farms. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
Late blight
Late blight

Late blight hitting potatoes too, and last call for pruning

Martha Foley gets an update from horticulturist Amy Ivy on late blight disease, which kills the foliage of tomato and potato plants. And they talk about summer pruning.  Go to full article

A rainy, cool summer and more on Late Blight

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about Late Blight, a disease that hits tomatoes and potatoes, harvesting garlic and lilies.  Go to full article
Late blight. (photo courtesy Cornell Cooperative Extension.)
Late blight. (photo courtesy Cornell Cooperative Extension.)

Late blight update, and rainy-weather gardening

Amy Ivy gives an update on late blight. And, with so much rain, plants may need more nitrogen. She has tips on how to tell and what to do.  Go to full article

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