Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "latinofarm"

Judge halts immigrant worker crackdown

A federal judge in San Francisco has ordered the Bush Administration to delay indefinitely a crackdown on undocumented immigrants. Dairy farmers in the North Country feared new rules on verifying social security numbers would wreak havoc with their workers. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Ag chief sounds off on farmworker crackdown

It's become common knowledge that thousands of workers on New York's farms, most from Latin America, are in this country illegally. They work on the books by presenting fake social security cards. The farmer is not obligated to--and has been legally precluded from--verifying the document. New York agriculture officials have been largely silent on this arrangement since latinos began arriving on farms here in the 1980s and '90s. That changed this month when Agriculture Commissioner Patrick Hooker wrote a letter to President Bush. He complained about a new federal crackdown on undocumented workers. It would punish farmers if their workers' social security numbers cannot be proven valid within 90 days. David Sommerstein spoke with Commissioner Hooker about the new policy.  Go to full article
Lowville veterinarian Mark Thomas at the school in Malacapetec.
Lowville veterinarian Mark Thomas at the school in Malacapetec.

Farm to Farm, Family to Family, part 3: the view from Lewis County

This week, we've been hearing the stories of a group of New York dairy farmers. In January, they traveled to a tiny mountain town in Mexico, where many of their milkers and farmhands come from. They wanted to better understand why their employees come thousands of miles to New York for work, and what that means for the immigration debate. Yesterday, we heard young Mexican men saying they wanted to work in the United States to make money. But eventually, they planned to return to their homes in Mexico. Immigration statistics tell a different story - the longer immigrants live in the United States, the more they want to stay here. In part three of a three part series, David Sommerstein looks at how Hispanic immigrants are affecting rural communities in New York and what the future may hold.  Go to full article
Above: Older houses in Malacatepec, below: new house built with wages earned on North Country dairy farms
Above: Older houses in Malacatepec, below: new house built with wages earned on North Country dairy farms

Farm to Farm, Family to Family, pt. 2: the cycle of migration

As Congress continues to craft ways to control immigration into the United States, the reality is that the allure of good paying jobs and a chance to improve one's conditions back home is hard to resist. In January, David Sommerstein traveled to Mexico with a group of New York dairy farmers. They went to a mountain town called Malacatepec, where names like Lowville, Carthage, and Utica are as familiar as they are here. Young men migrate South to North, leaving families behind, so they may one day come home to stay. In part two of a three-part series, David looks at their cycle of migration. One note: the dairy farmers in this series are identified by first name only to protect their farms and the Mexican immigrants who work there.  Go to full article

Mexican corridos: the people's autobiography in song

A St. Lawrence University professor specializes in a genre of Mexican music that tells the stories of how migrant workers get to the United States. Martha Chew-Sanchez is the author of a book called Corridos in Migrant Memory. She's invited a Mexican band, Los Inalcanzables to perform "corridos" tonight at 7 at SLU's Student Center. "Corridos" are epic songs that were first sung when the Spanish arrived in the New World. They're like the collective autobiography of Mexico, telling stories about everything from farming and famous heroes to drug smuggling and crossing the border. New ones are always written to reflect contemporary lives. Chew-Sanchez told David Sommerstein she grew up in the border region of El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico, where "corridos" told the stories of the day...  Go to full article

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 15