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News stories tagged with "law-enforcement"

Trevor Sisto, age 20, of Fort Covington NY has been charged with numerous felonies following last week's deadly crash.  Photo:  Lake Placid Village Police Department via Lake Placid News
Trevor Sisto, age 20, of Fort Covington NY has been charged with numerous felonies following last week's deadly crash. Photo: Lake Placid Village Police Department via Lake Placid News

Police say deadly Lake Placid car chase handled properly

State Police and the Police Chief in Lake Placid say a high-speed car chase that ended in a fatal accident last week in the Adirondacks was handled properly.

The crash on Rt. 86 in Ray Brook left a Potsdam couple dead and their eleven-year-old daughter with serious injuries.

In the days since the accident, questions have circulated in social media about whether police made a mistake in pursuing Trevor Sisto, age 20, who was fleeing a hit-and-run accident in Lake Placid.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/87007001@N04/13017908873/">Shaun Fisher</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
Photo: Shaun Fisher, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.

NY adding cameras for drivers running red lights

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed bills to expand the use of traffic cameras at intersections to catch drivers running red lights.

Bills recently approved by the Legislature will continue programs in New York City, as well Suffolk and Nassau counties and Rochester through 2019.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Heroin_aufkochen.JPG">Hendrike</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Hendrike, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

"First ever" statewide heroin database in the works

Another development in the epidemic of North Country heroin abuse: On Wednesday, police caught a man with 60 grams of heroin, driving near Gouverneur. As the Watertown Daily Times reports, Elvis Pigott of Massena allegedly had about $20,000-worth of the drug.

Police arrested Pigott in the town of Fowler. According to the Times, the bust was part of an undercover operation into heroin trafficking by the St. Lawrence County Drug Task Force.

Pigott's charged with third-degree criminal possession with intent to sell, among other charges. The arrest involved multiple, local police departments, working together with the help of federal agents.  Go to full article
District Attorney Derek Champagne from Franklin County says counties need to begin tracking and reporting heroin overdoses and deaths more accurately. He also wants better regional crime intelligence. NCPR File photo: Brian Mann
District Attorney Derek Champagne from Franklin County says counties need to begin tracking and reporting heroin overdoses and deaths more accurately. He also wants better regional crime intelligence. NCPR File photo: Brian Mann

Franklin County DA wants North Country crime intelligence center

One of the North Country's prosecutors says the region needs better intelligence-gathering to deal with the spread of crime, including a surge in heroin trafficking. Franklin County District Attorney Derek Champagne says he hopes to see crime analysts based in Malone who would help share information throughout the North Country.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/garysoup/367513235/">Gary Stevens</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Gary Stevens, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Massena responds to dirty needle discoveries

Massena's chief of police, Tim Currier, says he is looking into programs that would encourage safe disposal of used syringes. The syringes are a biohazard; sometimes they transmit diseases like Hepatitis C or HIV.

Last month, Massena police officers responded to 11 calls from people who found used syringes in public: in a park, near a school, and on Main Street.  Go to full article
Photo: David Sommerstein
Photo: David Sommerstein

Police agencies get millions to reduce gun deaths

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York law enforcement agencies will be receiving more than $13 million to reduce gun-related homicides.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday says the money will go to law enforcement agencies in 17 counties. The funding is allocated through the state's Gun Involved Violence Elimination initiative, designed to help local police in communities with high rates of violent crimes.  Go to full article
Trooper Jackson writes out a ticket for talking on the phone while driving along Rt. 11 between Canton and Potsdam. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Trooper Jackson writes out a ticket for talking on the phone while driving along Rt. 11 between Canton and Potsdam. Photo: Natasha Haverty

How to catch a distracted driver

In 2001, New York passed its first law banning the use of handheld cell phones while driving. Thirteen years later, penalties keep getting tougher; points keep getting higher. Just last year the state added 300 new signs along roadways across the state with the message "it can wait."

But we aren't waiting. People keep texting and making calls on the road, and it's such a problem that two years ago Gov. Andrew Cuomo overturned an almost 20-year ban on unmarked police cars, introducing a fleet of Concealed Identity Traffic Enforcement (or CITE) vehicles just to crack down on distracted drivers.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/intelfreepress/8598246170/in/photolist-8LuQST-e6Ng2C-8NUq62-8F1GRt-9Hb3L3-er4Ysk-6YWwXp-6FuAdr-6TVhwW-6LzRUk-6BCFa1-55TsLE-8jstrY-dUBZwd-68rFgK-e6Ng39-e6Ng2Y-ezkAcZ-a8KFqS-ecurxa-5TKcea-8LxqoL-7CoCJt-7CsswQ-9wzJbe-6AZMdx-e8fPdu-8k6njb-fM2ayo-6KEPat-7a1gjJ-cV6HRG-7CuzyH-cFhAbd-obBxG-8CXeMF-7pjLaz-bAgXr8-697dWL-5aKQs2-6S1AdZ-cckgTd-7H5WAA-6SWt65-g9oBY7-cjQptA-74zffL-74vmwM-74v8UK-74v8J6">Intel Free Press</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Intel Free Press, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Distracted driving more likely to get you in trouble April 10-15

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) State and local police are increasing patrols and checkpoints statewide from April 10 to 15 to encourage drivers not to use their mobile phones.

Authorities say "Operation Hang Up" combines anti-texting and cell phone law enforcement with advertisements to let people know about the push and convince them to obey the law.

The first offense is a minimum fine of $50. That can increase to $400 for the third offense.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomma/4906491235/">Thomas Marthinsen</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Thomas Marthinsen, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cops meet in Ft. Edward to discuss heroin problem

FORT EDWARD, N.Y. (AP) Scores of law enforcement officers from New York, Vermont and Massachusetts have met in an upstate county that has become a crossroad in the trafficking of heroin to northern New England.

The Post-Star of Glens Falls reports that about 90 local, state and federal officers met Thursday at the Washington County Sheriff's Office to discuss how to combat the growing heroin problem in the Northeast.  Go to full article
Human Trafficking in Our Backyard. Poster: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/74442773@N03/7418920888/<br />">John Eng Cheng, Inheritance Magazine</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Human Trafficking in Our Backyard. Poster: John Eng Cheng, Inheritance Magazine, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Four kinds of human trafficking in the North Country

More than 40 agencies across the North Country are coming together to fight some of the darkest underground crimes. The North Country Human Trafficking task force says smuggling rings funnel vulnerable people into forced prostitution, indentured servitude, and debt bondage. And while it's not common, it is happening here in the North Country.

The task force is holding trainings to help law enforcement, not-for-profits, and churches learn to identify victims of human trafficking. David Sommerstein attended one in Canton.  Go to full article

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