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News stories tagged with "law"

Border Patrol vehicles await the bus in Canton.
Border Patrol vehicles await the bus in Canton.

Citizenship questions far from the border

Across the North Country, border patrol road checkpoints where agents stop cars and ask passengers their citizenship have become a part of daily life. Today we have a story about another step in the creeping influence of homeland security inside the border.

It's now become commonplace for federal agents to board buses and trains across Upstate New York and ask passengers for proof of citizenship. The checks are sweeping up some drugs and illegal immigrants, but also people who are here legally. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser
Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser

Immigration bureaucracy lands legal residents in detention

One wrinkle in the immigration picture has been particularly difficult for foreign students and professionals working in the U.S.

There are two agencies within Homeland Security that handle visas. The one that issues them is U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. It says a foreign national may reapply or change a visa status "in a timely manner" before its expiration date. The visa itself may take weeks or months to process. The U.S. Border Patrol however, only looks at the expiration date.

If a person's visa has expired, that person is subject to detention. Immigration lawyer Hilary Fraser of Ithaca has defended clients caught between these two interpretations of the law. She told David Sommerstein one was a Filipino national living in Watertown.  Go to full article
Sheriff Henry Hommes passed away Friday in Essex County
Sheriff Henry Hommes passed away Friday in Essex County

Veteran Essex County sheriff Henry Hommes remembered

Essex County's veteran sherrif, Henry Hommes passed away Friday night after a battle with cancer. Hommes was re-elected last year and was serving his thirteenth year in the post. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Whitewater paddlers recently gained access to Ausable Chasm for the first time. (Photo: Allen Mann)
Whitewater paddlers recently gained access to Ausable Chasm for the first time. (Photo: Allen Mann)

Range war pits paddlers against property owners on North Country rivers

Over the last 20 years, sport paddlers in the Adirondacks have been pushing the limit on the kind of water their canoes, rafts, and kayaks can navigate. They've developed new techniques and new equipment that can handle more aggressive rapids and even waterfalls. And paddlers are also waging fierce legal battles to try to open more rivers, including routes that offer access to remote wilderness areas.

Some landowners are pushing back, arguing the sport is stepping on their private property rights. As Brian Mann reports, the dispute has sparked a kind of range war on some of the North Country's most beautiful rivers.  Go to full article
Gov. Paterson at the Olympic Museum in lake Placid, where he signed a new law beefing up DWI enforcement. Photo: Adirondack Daily Entperprise.
Gov. Paterson at the Olympic Museum in lake Placid, where he signed a new law beefing up DWI enforcement. Photo: Adirondack Daily Entperprise.

Paterson signs "Jack Shea" anti-DWI law

Gov. David Paterson signed a new law closing a legal loophole that prevented the driver accused of killing Olympic medalist and Lake Placid native Jack Shea from standing trial.

It authorizes certified nurse practitioners and advanced emergency medical technicians to draw blood from motorists suspected of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol--without a doctor present. Paterson says "Jack Shea's Law" simply brings the legal standard into conformity with standard medical practice.

In 2002, a driver faced charges in the crash outside Lake Placid that killed 91-year-old Shea, who won two gold medals for speedskating at the 1932 Olympics. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Adirondack landowner takes case against green groups, APA to federal court

A landowner in the Adirondack town of Black Brook is suing the Adirondack Park agency in federal court. Leroy Douglas alleges the agency conspired illegally with the Adirondack Council and with other environmental activists. He's asking for tens of millions of dollars in compensation.

This suit follows years of tension between the APA and a group of landowners and local officials in Black Brook. Douglas argues the park agency has become "a tool of environmentalists and wealthy downstate interests." He filed a similar lawsuit in November in state court. Earlier this month, the Adirondack Council urged a judge to dismiss the state court case, arguing that it had been filed in "bad faith."

Speaking before this latest suit, Adirondack Council spokesman John Sheehan described Douglas's allegations as an effort to "silence" green groups in the Park. APA officials have also denied repeatedly that any illegal or improper behavior occurred.  Go to full article

Village judge in Saranac Lake censured for ?improper? activity

A village justice in Saranac Lake has been censured by the New York State Commission on Judicial Conduct for what it described as "improper activity." The panel stopped short of removing the judge from office. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Mary Rain, St. Lawrence County's Public Defender, shows her staff's overbooked schedules.
Mary Rain, St. Lawrence County's Public Defender, shows her staff's overbooked schedules.

Year of Hard Choices: public defenders swamped

Tonight, the St. Lawrence County legislature takes up a measure to increase the salaries of its public attorneys. The vote comes after more than half of the county's 21 lawyers have resigned in the last year. Many cited low pay and high workload for their departure. St. Lawrence may be an extreme example. But across the North Country, the recession is putting increased stress on lawyers in public defenders and district attorneys' offices. For our series, A Year of Hard Choices, David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

State conservation officials still at odds with key Adirondack environmental law

In the latest issue of the Adirondack Explorer magazine, our reporter Brian Mann tells the surprising story of the Adirondack Park's State Land Master Plan.

The "SLUMP," as it's known, shapes nearly every activity in the Adirondack forest preserve, from hiking and snowmobile trails to the building of roads and lean-tos.

While researching the story, Brian learned that the regulations developed in the 1960s have been a source of friction and animosity among state officials for decades - often pitting the Department of Environmental Conservation against the Adirondack Park Agency.

Brian spoke about his report with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Salim "Sandy" Lewis (middle) and Barbara Lewis (right) talk with supporters in Elizabethtown
Salim "Sandy" Lewis (middle) and Barbara Lewis (right) talk with supporters in Elizabethtown

Essex County farmer, APA meet in NY Supreme Court

A farmer in Essex County squared off against the Adirondack Park Agency yesterday in an Elizabethtown courtroom. Sandy Lewis, who runs an 1,100-acre organic farm in the town of Essex, says the APA overstepped its authority in trying to regulate three new houses built for workers on his farm. As Brian Mann reports, the case now before the state Supreme Court has emerged as a major confrontation between farm-rights advocates and state officials.  Go to full article

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