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News stories tagged with "lawn"

Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley
Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley

Why does my lawn look like a giant ant farm?

The spring thaw has finally reached dirt, revealing the winter damage underneath. On lawns, that could include dramatic networks of dirt-lined runways left under this winter's snow pack by voles.

Voles work the surface, tunneling through where the snow meets the lawn. They're vegetarians, and like to eat away at the roots of the grass. Horticulturist Amy Ivy says the lawn's probably too soft to walk on yet, and it's probably too soon to do too much in the way of repair just yet. When things dry out a bit, she suggests raking the damaged area lightly, to level the tunneled areas out. And have some grass seed on hand to reseed after the weather warms up.

Moles throw up bigger mounds of dirt from their underground tunnels. Rake those to spread the dirt around; those areas can be reseeded to grass later as well.

Amy says it's also time to do some remedial pruning where trees and shrubs were broken during the winter. And she talks about best practices for pruning flowering shrubs now.  Go to full article
Last chance for planting garlic bulbs. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/34167928@N05/3583522970/">artefatia</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Last chance for planting garlic bulbs. Photo: artefatia, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Last call for fall garden chores

With a mix of snow and rain in the forecast this week, horticulturist Amy Ivy says this is really the last week for getting bulbs - garlic, tulip - in the ground this season. Amy also spoke with Todd Moe about putting the lawn to bed for the winter.  Go to full article

Turf talk: taking care of the lawn

Horticulturist Amy Ivy reminds gardeners and homeowners not to neglect the lawn in late summer. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

The do's and don'ts of lawn care

Knowing how to care for your lawn year-round is important. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has tips on spring and summer lawn mowing. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

Greener Ways to Get a Green Lawn

Polls indicate the majority of people want to do better toward the environment. One of the most polluting activities at many homes is lawn care. Lawn mowers spew out emissions that pollute at a higher rate than cars. Lawn sprinklers can use massive amounts of water. And over-use of fertilizer can pollute nearby streams. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham looks at simple things you can do to reduce pollution and still have a green lawn.  Go to full article

A Timeline for the Lawn

Horticulturist Amy Ivy tells Martha Foley why it's almost time to give the lawn it's last feeding, but not quite.  Go to full article

To Bag or Not to Bag Grass Clippings

At one point or another, most of us have had to do yard work. If it was one of your chores as a kid, you probably developed a strong aversion to it. But as we settle into our own homes, something interesting happens. Taking care of the yard becomes important. But is there an environmental impact? The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's David Hammond takes a closer look at his own suburban back yard.  Go to full article

Time to Finish Those Outdoor Chores

Horticulturist Amy Ivy has tips on feeding the lawn, mowing and mulching leaves and other late autumn garden chores.  Go to full article

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