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News stories tagged with "legislature"

Gov. Cuomo delivering his 2011 state of the state message.
Gov. Cuomo delivering his 2011 state of the state message.

Second term priorities expected in State of the State

Governor Cuomo will deliver his second State of the State message today. As Karen DeWitt reports, the governor faces continued budget deficits, and a soft economy as well as a looming redistricting deadline.  Go to full article
Todd and Michelle Asselin raise free range livestock and work day jobs.
Todd and Michelle Asselin raise free range livestock and work day jobs.

Farmers Under 40: Big and Small, We Need 'Em All

There's no doubt farming's a volatile industry. With grain and gas prices constantly fluctuating, and more and more consumers searching for low prices, it's no wonder the number of farms has dropped. Last summer, NCPR traveled the North Country looking for the next generation of farmers. This week, we're listening back to some of the stories we found.

The key to farming since the 1970s has been to go big with a few cash crops, search out efficiency, utilize technology and produce more from each acre.

Some young farmers want to do it their own way. They want to stay small, avoid mainstream distribution and maybe grow organic. These new farmers face different challenges from their traditional predecessors, but they can't avoid the economics. Steve Knight tackled the knotty subject of farm economics.  Go to full article
This wasn’t supposed to be a get-out-of–jail-free card.

New state ethics law just the beginning, say some

Governor Cuomo signed into law new ethics oversight legislation, but some say the measure is flawed, and that there is still work to be done to fight corruption in government. In Albany, Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article
Any downsizing of the congressional representation in upstate New York should at the very least begin in western New York

Redistricting task force hears regional concerns

The state task force that will draw up new electoral maps in New York State was in Syracuse yesterday to begin a string of public hearings.

New York's losing two congressional seats because of population losses reported in the last Census.

As WRVO's Ellen Abbott reports, the task force, known as "Latfor", heard all about why neither of those seats should come from the districts that span central and northern New York.  Go to full article

Congressman Bill Owens: "Cut, Cap and Balance" a "waste of time"

Lawmakers are voting today on a Republican measure to increase the government's borrowing limit and maintain America's "Triple A" credit rating. The House's GOP majority is backing a "cut, cap and balance" plan that would allow the U.S. to borrow some $2.4 trillion.

But first, politicians must agree to big spending cuts that will go into effect almost immediately. Republicans also want a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced federal budget. North Country Congressman Bill Owens, a Democrat, says he won't support the plan. He spoke with Chris Morris.  Go to full article
Todd and Michelle Asselin raise free range livestock and work day jobs.
Todd and Michelle Asselin raise free range livestock and work day jobs.

Farmers Under 40: Big and Small, We Need 'Em All

There's no doubt farming's a volatile industry. With grain and gas prices constantly fluctuating, and more and more consumers searching for low prices, it's no wonder the number of farms has dropped.

The key to farming since the 1970s has been to go big with a few cash crops, search out efficiency, utilize technology, and produce more from each acre.

Some young farmers want to do it their own way. They want to stay small, avoid mainstream distribution, and maybe grow organic. These new farmers face different challenges from their traditional predecessors, but they can't avoid the economics.  Go to full article
Let's see how it works for a few years... before we start lopping away pieces of it.

Cuomo vetoes bill to allow schools to borrow against pension funds

Governor Cuomo has vetoed a bill that would have allowed school districts to borrow up to $1 billion dollars against the worth of their pension funds, saying the bill would be fiscally irresponsible and reckless, and would undo much of what Cuomo's tried to do with his 2% property tax cap. Karen DeWitt has the details.  Go to full article

Little: change in prisoner count could cut district numbers

New York lawmakers have begun the process of reshaping electoral districts following last year's census. Last week, a redistricting task force announced it would ignore a law requiring prison inmates to be counted at their last known address.

That angered civil rights advocates, who argue home districts deserve credit for the prisoners, for electoral representation as well as state aid and services that depend on population. But the change worries North Country representatives whose districts have long counted prisoners where they're incarcerated.

The law passed in 2010 when Democrats controlled both legislative houses and the governor's mansion. The measure has since been challenged in court by nine Republican state senators. Betty Little of Queensbury is a plaintiff in that lawsuit. She isn't commenting on the suit, but she told Chris Morris the loss to her district would be significant, 9,000 to 10,000 people.  Go to full article

Redistricting begins, amid controversy

Albany lawmakers are starting work on redistricting - drawing new electoral district lines to reflect population changes found by the last Census.

Traditionally, that's a highly political process driven by the major parties. Called "gerrymandering" -- it's held responsible for insuring long-held incumbencies in the state Senate and Assembly, and Congress.

Karen Dewitt has this report on the push to find a new, nonpartisan way to draw the districts.  Go to full article
New York State district map, nysenate.gov
New York State district map, nysenate.gov

New districts won't change prisoner count, task force says

Leaders of a legislative task force on redistricting say they won't be able to count state prison inmates as residing in their home districts, because of an ongoing lawsuit.

Karen DeWitt has more from Albany:  Go to full article

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