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News stories tagged with "local-food"

Root crops at the Glens Falls Farmers Market. Archive Photo of the Day: Stuart Delman, Chestertown NY.
Root crops at the Glens Falls Farmers Market. Archive Photo of the Day: Stuart Delman, Chestertown NY.

NYS wants to make farmers' markets more accessible

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York state wants to make farmers' markets more accessible to low-income consumers.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the state will make $130,000 in grants available this year to support at least 13 traditional farmers' market and youth market grant projects.  Go to full article
Richard Ball, owner of Schoharie Valley Farms. Photo: NYS Dept. of Agriculture & Markets
Richard Ball, owner of Schoharie Valley Farms. Photo: NYS Dept. of Agriculture & Markets

A vegetable farmer to head dairy-heavy NY agriculture

The people who run New York's department of agriculture and markets tend to have close ties with the state's huge dairy industry. The last commissioner, Cape Vincent's Darrel Aubertine, was a dairy farmer himself.

Governor Cuomo broke that mold when he nominated Schoharie county vegetable farmer, Richard Ball, to be the next agriculture commissioner.

Ball is a poster child for the "locally grown" movement. His roadside stand, the Carrot Barn, sells a full range of vegetables and fruits grown on his farm. It also sells local beef and dairy products, and even has a farm-fresh lunch counter. Ball also sells wholesale to brokers and restaurants in New York City.  Go to full article

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Clarkson University executive chef Kyle Mayette at the Main Street Grill, where its sells locally grown food from veggies to burgers.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Clarkson University executive chef Kyle Mayette at the Main Street Grill, where its sells locally grown food from veggies to burgers. Photo: Todd Moe

Clarkson eatery goes local

Serving locally grown food in college dining spots is nothing new, but Clarkson University has taken the concept one step further. Todd Moe checks out an eatery at Clarkson where every ingredient comes from a farm within 200 miles of the Potsdam campus: beef from Brasher Falls, goat cheese from Vermont and vegetables from Quebec.

Clarkson executive chef Kyle Mayette says the challenge will be creating a menu at the Main Street Grill in the Cheel Campus Center that changes seasonally.  Go to full article
Peter Paquin likes what he sees in the harvest.
Peter Paquin likes what he sees in the harvest.

Cranberries bumper crop in Brasher Falls

Looking for that local touch for your Thanksgiving table? Try cranberries, fresh from a bog in northern St. Lawrence County. Peter Paquin owns Deer River Cranberries in Brasher Falls.

He says local sales of his cranberries have grown fivefold. He sells to North Country apple orchards and stores in Potsdam and Lake Placid. Paquin says people even drive up to the farm to load up coolers full of berries. "Yeah, they basically come in with coolers and we fill 'em up, basically 50 pounds in a cooler," says Paquin. "We've probably sold to 20 different people in the area, a hundred pounds each. We're moving a lot of berries locally."

Paquin says the hot, dry summer and the recent freezing nights have meant a late harvest. But he says cranberries remain as lucrative a crop as ever. David Sommerstein visited Paquin's cranberry bogs in 2008.  Go to full article
Ken Hebb in the future space of the St. Lawrence Brewing Company. Photo: David Sommerstein
Ken Hebb in the future space of the St. Lawrence Brewing Company. Photo: David Sommerstein

Canton's first microbrewery prepares to set up shop

Like Governor Cuomo at his beer, wine, and liquor summit Wednesday in Albany, a pair of Canton entrepreneurs is hoping craft beer sales will provide an economic lift.

Ken and Katrina Hebb, owners of the Blackbird Cafe in Canton, are starting St. Lawrence County's first microbrewery. The St. Lawrence Brewing Company is leasing space in a new industrial building in Canton. They're ready to start moving in next week and hope to start selling beer by St. Patrick's Day.

Ken Hebb gave David Sommerstein a tour.  Go to full article
Eating and ambling at last year's Farm 2 Fork festival. Photo: Todd Moe
Eating and ambling at last year's Farm 2 Fork festival. Photo: Todd Moe

Farmers, cooks and food lovers gather in Saranac Lake

Saranac Lake's Farm 2 Fork Festival will celebrate local farms and bounty on Saturday. The annual end-of-summer event includes workshops, cooking demonstrations and, of course, a chance to eat locally grown food. Adirondack Green Circle founder Gail Brill, who's organizing the event in Riverside Park, says it's a user-friendly festival and a place to learn new skills. She spoke with Todd Moe about the event's featured guest, Maryland chicken farmer Carole Morison, who will give a special presentation tonight at the Harrietstown Town Hall.  Go to full article
Matt Volz, owner of Greyrock Farm near Cazenovia in Madison County, shows off one of his farm's meat chickens. Photo: Joanna Richards
Matt Volz, owner of Greyrock Farm near Cazenovia in Madison County, shows off one of his farm's meat chickens. Photo: Joanna Richards

Overcoming obstacles to a local foods economy

In the last couple weeks, NCPR has been looking at the local foods that have been turning up on more grocery store shelves and in restaurants in Northern New York.

In the third piece in our local food series we look at some of the challenges and obstacles to the local food economy and how farmers, retailers, restaurateurs and others are working to overcome them.  Go to full article

Flavor Fest at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake

If you're interested in eating locally, the folks at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake are setting up a feast of information and food today. Stefanie Ratcliffe is director of the Wild Center. She says they hold a farmer's market every Thursday, but they wanted to do more to help people find ways to eat locally and to find local food and beer producers.  Go to full article
Tender seedlings may need water.
Tender seedlings may need water.

TLC for the young garden

It's a challenging year, no doubt about it, for gardeners and commercial growers -- and the plants they're tending. There may be too much water in some places, but not enough in others, after a series of dry, sunny and windy days, and a couple of nights in the 30s. Cornell Cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has some reminders about garden TLC in her weekly chat with Martha Foley.
And they preview workshops on using local food, homegrown or not, starting next week in Sacket's Harbor, Canton and Plattsburgh.  Go to full article

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