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News stories tagged with "locavore"

Keeping in touch with The Garden Plot

NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, have been keeping track of gardens across the North Country in a project we call The Garden Plot.

At midsummer, our plot has grown, just like the gardens we've been watching. Martha Foley talks with TAUNY's Jill Breit about what we've learned from gardeners about growing vegetables and collaborating on the internet.  Go to full article
Chef Steve Mitton at Murray Street Restaurant, part of Ottawa's bustling food scene. Photo: Lucy Martin
Chef Steve Mitton at Murray Street Restaurant, part of Ottawa's bustling food scene. Photo: Lucy Martin

Canadian brings a European sensibility to the "new" eat local movement

Last week, David Sommerstein reported that a shortage of meat cutters and slaughterhouses is a limiting factor in the growing trend to eat local. He visited New York State's only certification program for butchers, at SUNY Cobleskill. (see link below)

Turns out Americans across the country are learning the details about how their meat is butchered. Many self-described foodies are taking classes where they work with experienced butchers, donning aprons and using cleavers, saws and hatchets to cut up slaughtered pigs and other animals.

Organizers say the classes indicate the public's growing interest in how the food they eat affects their health and the planet. They say that interest is driving more people to shop at farmers markets and even raise chickens in their backyards.

Canadian chef Steve Mitton, co-owner and head chef of Murray Street Restaurant in Ottawa's Byward Market, is part of that broad culinary movement.

Mitton's kitchen combines creativity with efficiency, using techniques he learned from butchers in Germany, where eat local is nothing new. He told Lucy Martin his apprenticeship was kind of an accident.  Go to full article

Getting more consumers to eat local

Over the next few days, farm leaders are taking a sort of local food road show across the North Country. Cornell Cooperative Extension is offering an "Eating Local Yet?" conference tomorrow in Plattsburgh, Friday in Canton, and Saturday in Watertown.

The goal is to persuade more consumers to buy local fruits, vegetables, meat, and dairy. The keynote speaker is one of the pioneer's of the local food movement.

Jennifer Wilkins is nutritional science expert at Cornell University. She wrote the nation's first food guide tailored to regional eating in the 1990s. She told David Sommerstein processed foods that rely on commodity subsidies and a heavy carbon footprint dominate the supermarket and fuel America's obesity epidemic. Local produce, on the other hand, is fresh and better for you and the land.

"Eating Local Yet?" conference, which will be held tomorrow night in Plattsburgh, Friday night in Canton, and Saturday afternoon in Watertown. The event will provide contacts for local farmers, recipes to cook local produce and meat, and lessons on how to make your own sauerkraut, lard, and other foodstuffs. Pre-registration is required. Contact your local extension office to register. The fee is $10.  Go to full article

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