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News stories tagged with "logging"

The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo:  Dan Snyder)
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo: Dan Snyder)

Nature Conservancy loggers accused of damaging Adirondack trout stream

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy has emerged in recent years as one of the largest owners of timberland in the North Country.

The green group uses certified logging methods designed to protect rivers and other sensitive ecosystems.

But a landowner in Essex County is accusing the Conservancy's tree-cutters of damaging a certified trout stream.

As Brian Mann reports, state officials have opened an investigation.  Go to full article
We measured the wood and it was very short. 50% less than we paid for.

Wood dealers selling short cords?

Record-setting snowfall and sub-zero temperatures in the Northeast have led to increased demand for firewood this heating season. There's also been an uptick in complaints by consumers who say they're getting less firewood than they pay for. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, WNPR's Diane Orson reports.

Northeast environmental reporting is made possible, in part, by a grant from United Technologies.  Go to full article
Deborah Dunleavy
Deborah Dunleavy

The Crystal: A New Year's tale from northern Quebec

Brockville storyteller Deborah Dunleavy shares a midwinter tale about a young logger and a flying canoe at a lumber camp in northern Quebec.  Go to full article
Annis Holmes, of Chestertown, models a pair of hand knit Adirondack buff mittens.
Annis Holmes, of Chestertown, models a pair of hand knit Adirondack buff mittens.

Heard Up North: mittens for a winter's work

Sometimes our stories and conversations kindle memories from listeners. Andy Flynn's "Adirondack Attic" segment this month about a pair of vintage mittens at the Adirondack Museum inspired a phone call from Milda Burns, a longtime listener and local historian in North River.

For today's Heard Up North, Milda recounts how her father learned a valuable lesson as a young woodsman in the southern Adirondacks in the 1880s.  Go to full article

Preview: songs of the lumberjacks

Folksinger and storyteller Lee Knight will lead a program of music and stories from Adirondack logging camps and mining towns in North Creek on Sunday. Knight grew up in Saranac Lake, and has devoted his career to preserving traditional music in the Adirondacks and the Appalachians. He joined Todd Moe in the studio this morning to share old-time music and tales.  Go to full article

Huge Adirondack land deal completed in Clinton, Franklin Counties

New York state has purchased conservation easements on another huge swath of timberland in the northeastern Adirondacks. The $10.8 million deal was completed last week. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Alleged timber theft triggers charges in Washington County

Two Washington county residents have been accused of logging more than $30,000 worth of trees from land they don't own. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article
Aimee Hurt has trained dogs for conservation work for nine years
Aimee Hurt has trained dogs for conservation work for nine years

A dog's job: studying moose in the Adirondacks

Wildlife biologists say that New York state is home to more than 500 moose. Their population has surged in recent years. Researchers would like to know a lot more about the animals: what they're eating, where they're going, and why their numbers are growing so rapidly. A new project organized by the Wildlife Conservation Society aims to gather some of that data using trained tracking dogs. Brian Mann spent a day with a research team in the northern Adirondacks and has our story.  Go to full article
OK Slip Falls, one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal (Photo:  C. Heilman, courtesy of Adk Nature Conservancy)
OK Slip Falls, one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal (Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy of Adk Nature Conservancy)

NY to expand forest preserve with massive piece of Finch, Pruyn tract

State environment officials and the Nature Conservancy say they've struck a deal that will protect more than 134,000 acres of timberland in the Adirondacks. The plan, unveiled late Thursday, was described as historic by DEC commissioner Pete Grannis. It will affect most of the former Finch, Pruyn lands, which the Nature Conservancy purchased last year for $110 million. 57,000 acres will be added to the state forest preserve. Another 73,000 acres will continue to be logged, but all other forms of development will be blocked by conservation easements. Most of the land lies in the towns of Newcomb, Minerva, Long Lake, Indian Lake, and North Hudson. State officials say it's not clear how much taxpayers will pay for the massive preservation deal. Local government leaders have raised concerns about the impact on local economies and the lack of public hearings for the project. But backers of the plan say it strikes a balance between the needs of local communities and the environment.

Brian Mann spoke with Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, and with DEC Commissioner Pete Grannis.  Go to full article

More on the Nature Conservancy land deal

Martha Foley talks with NCPR Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann a little more about the land deal unveiled yesterday.  Go to full article

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