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News stories tagged with "loons"

Common loon adult and young. Photo: Nina Schoch
Common loon adult and young. Photo: Nina Schoch

Vermont loon count gauging health of bird

COLCHESTER, Vt. (AP) Experts estimate there are nearly 300 adult loons living on Vermont's lakes and ponds, up from just a couple dozen 30 years ago.

On Saturday, more than 200 volunteers spread out across Vermont for the annual loon survey.  Go to full article
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb.  Photo: Paul Hai
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb. Photo: Paul Hai

Newcomb season starts with loons and logs on Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its third rubber loon race on Saturday. It's an opportunity to get outside, rain or shine, and connect with nature. Other activities will include a bird walk, a presentation on "plein air" art by Artist-in-Residence Frances Gaffney, and Windy Baker will lead an Adirondack chair building workshop.

The art and outdoors events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's third year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
Culture of clostridium botulinum, which produces the botulism toxins. Photo courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory. Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.
Culture of clostridium botulinum, which produces the botulism toxins. Photo courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory. Creative Commons. Some rights reserved.

Botulism kills hundreds of loons in Lake Ontario

Type E Botulism, a disease caused by a toxic bacteria, is back in Lake Ontario. And over the last month or so, it's killed several hundred loons, ducks and other birds.

Type E Botulism has triggered annual bird kills in several Great Lakes since the late 1990s. But they've been largely minor on Lake Ontario for the last seven years. That is until residents around Henderson Harbor and Ellisburg in Jefferson County started calling the DEC in late October.  Go to full article
You could win this handmade loon quilt in a raffle Sunday. Photo: Nina Schoch
You could win this handmade loon quilt in a raffle Sunday. Photo: Nina Schoch

A loon celebration at Paul Smiths

This Sunday, loon lovers will get together to celebrate the iconic Adirondack bird, and raise money for loon research. The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation is hosting a day of music, food, and games at the Paul Smiths VIC from 9 to 5 on Sunday. There'll also be a silent auction, a raffle for handmade loon quilt, and a loon calling contest.

Nina Schoch, the loon center's director, told David Sommerstein there will also be a field trip to see and learn about loons from the experts.  Go to full article
David Sommerstein holds (and interviews a loon chick. Photo: Nancie Battaglia
David Sommerstein holds (and interviews a loon chick. Photo: Nancie Battaglia

Loons sound alarm on mercury pollution

Loons have enjoyed unprecedented population growth over the last 30 years. They outlived DDT and a time when people used to shoot loons for sport.

In the new issue of Adirondack Life on newsstands now, David Sommerstein has an article on how a study of loons finds that things could have been even better. The culprit is mercury pollution. Last summer, David joined researchers banding loons in the middle of the night near Old Forge and filed this story.  Go to full article
Researchers Rick Grey and Nina Schoch weigh an adult loon. Photo: BRI's Adk Center for Loon Conservation
Researchers Rick Grey and Nina Schoch weigh an adult loon. Photo: BRI's Adk Center for Loon Conservation

Adirondack loon sentinels lack funding this summer

For 15 years, researchers have been keeping an eye on loons in the Adirondacks to make sure their nests stay safe. But a funding shortfall means much of that monitoring may not happen this summer.  Go to full article

Loons and logs in Newcomb Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its second rubber loon race and the return of a 100-year-old Adirondack guide boat on Saturday.

The two events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's second annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's second year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
Researchers Rick Grey and Nina Schoch weigh an adult loon. Photo courtesy Biodiversity Research Institute's Center for Loon Conservation
Researchers Rick Grey and Nina Schoch weigh an adult loon. Photo courtesy Biodiversity Research Institute's Center for Loon Conservation

Loons sound alarm on mercury pollution

The Adirondacks' beloved icon, the Common Loon, has left for its winter home on the Atlantic coast.

Loons have enjoyed unprecedented population growth over the last 30 years. They outlived DDT and a time when people used to shoot loons for sport. But a recent study says things could have been even better. This time the culprit is mercury pollution.  Go to full article

Logging, rubber loon race in Newcomb

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb will try a new twist on the "rubber duck race" on Saturday, using rubber loons instead. The event is part of the center's celebration of its first anniversary under the leadership of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Proceeds will support educational programs at the center.

The event will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Visitor's center program coordinator Paul Hai told Todd Moe that a California company, CelebriDucks, manufactured the rubber loons for the race.  Go to full article
Loon on Lake Ozonia, submitted as Photo of the Day 7/7/10. Photo: Joe Woody
Loon on Lake Ozonia, submitted as Photo of the Day 7/7/10. Photo: Joe Woody

DEC steps up loon protection

Environmental officials say they've seen an "unusual" amount of loon harassment in the Adirondacks this summer.

As Jonathan Brown reports, police with the state's Department of Environmental Conservation issued three tickets for separate incidents in June and July.  Go to full article

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