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News stories tagged with "manure"

A methane dome is a recognizable part of an anaerobic digester system. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/45914503@N00/7269576888/">Dan Hartung</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
A methane dome is a recognizable part of an anaerobic digester system. Photo: Dan Hartung, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.

St. Lawrence co. dairy gets digester grant

A large dairy farm in St. Lawrence County is getting more than $400,000 for a methane digester. The grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will help Woodcrest Dairy in Lisbon pay for the estimated $2.5-million project.  Go to full article
Manure pile. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/87255087@N00/3572826346/">Knitting Iris</a>, CC some rights reserved
Manure pile. Photo: Knitting Iris, CC some rights reserved

Manure in the garden

Best practices in gardening can change over the years. Martha Foley and cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy talk about new wisdom on the best ways to use manure in the early spring garden.  Go to full article

The garden race begins

Healthy garden soil plays a big part in a successful growing season. Martha Foley talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about tips for improving and amending your soil.  Go to full article

Manure spilled into St. Lawrence

An unknown quantity of liquid manure from a St. Lawrence County dairy farm spilled into the St. Lawrence River last week. Environment officials say the spill didn't appear to be large enough to harm fish or wildlife. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Steve McKnight and son by one manure pit.
Steve McKnight and son by one manure pit.

'Mega-Dairies': Stewards or Polluters?

State environment officials continue to investigate what caused a 3 million gallon manure spill in the Black River near Lowville. A lagoon failed on the Marks Farm, a 3,000 cow dairy operation. The manure flooded into the river, killing an estimated 200,000 fish and devastating tourism for at least two weeks. The catastrophe is firing up a debate over whether large farms are safe for people or the environment. The New York Times penned a scathing editorial on what it termed "mega-dairies". The paper called for "far stricter environmental standards" and opportunities for communities to vote large farms out of town. There are more than 100 dairy farms in the North Country with more than 300 cows. The farmers say their operations are cleaner and safer than ever. But critics question that, and they wonder whether the facilities should be treated as farms at all. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Lewis County Farm Fined Millions for Manure Spill

The Lewis County dairy farm that spilled millions of gallons of liquid manure into the Black River could have to pay more than $2 million in fines. The Department of Environmental Conservation announced several alleged violations and fines yesterday. They included paying ten dollars for every fish the manure killed. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Cow Manure to Power SUNY Canton

Manure is a headache for every dairy farmer. Canton Farmer Joe TeRiele says its the most expensive part of farming. Even though his farm is considered small - he has around 800 cows - those cows produce over 14,000 gallons of manure and wastewater a day.

TeRiele stores the manure and uses it for fertilizer. Starting next fall, he'll be getting electricity from the manure as well. Next-door SUNY Canton is building a methane digester on the TeRiele farm - it will supply electricity to the farm and the college.  Go to full article

What Is Liquid Manure?

Following the 3 million-gallon liquid manure spill in the Black River last week, we wanted to know why farmers use liquid manure in the first place. So David Sommerstein called Brent Buchanan of the Cornell Cooperatve Extension of St. Lawrence County. He says in the old days on dairy farms, each milking cow had its own stall with its own bedding.  Go to full article

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