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News stories tagged with "maple"

Brett McLeod over the evaporator. Photo: Sarah Harris
Brett McLeod over the evaporator. Photo: Sarah Harris

Too cold? Too warm? Hitting the sweet spot for maple

Continuing deep cold through the end of March had maple producers worrying if they'd have a season at all this year.

But remember two years ago, when it felt like we barely had a winter? Maple syrup producers struggled then, too, because it wasn't cold enough.

That year, Sarah Harris went to an usually warm Adirondack "boil" (click "listen" to hear the sounds of the boil.)  Go to full article
Josh Parker stands next to his pellet-fired evaporator at his sugar shack near Canton. Photo: Todd Moe
Josh Parker stands next to his pellet-fired evaporator at his sugar shack near Canton. Photo: Todd Moe

Canton teen is young maple syrup entrepreneur

Joshua Parker doesn't have his driver's license yet, but he's a young maple syrup entrepreneur with big plans. At 16, he's one of the country's youngest maple producers.

Joshua catches rides with his dad and neighbors to check the taps in his sugar bush. And even though he relies on advice from more experienced maple producers, he's the boss and owner of Parker Maple Farm, near Canton. Five years ago, he started tapping sap with 10 buckets, as a hobby. Last year, he got serious and installed a tubing system with 3,500 taps. He created a business plan, borrowed money for state-of-the-art equipment (with help from his parents) and is waiting for the sap to start flowing.  Go to full article
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid.   The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid. The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour. Photo: Todd Moe

Why maple syrup matters: from tree to tap to market

With the start of the traditional maple sugaring season just weeks away, Todd Moe talks with Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's maple research field station near Lake Placid.

He's written a new book, The Sugarmaker's Companion, which explores tapping trees for sap, marketing maple syrup and the economics of sugaring.  Go to full article
Brett McLeod over the evaporator
Brett McLeod over the evaporator

Neighbors gather for a warm-weather "boil"

The unusually warm weather this March hasn't been great for sugar makers. Maple syrup yields across northern New York and Vermont have been low, and a lot of producers are pulling their taps. But in spite of the strange temperatures, sugaring traditions remain alive and well. Sarah Harris went to an Adirondack "boil" and sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article
A sapbucket at Newton's Sugarbush. Photo: Todd Moe
A sapbucket at Newton's Sugarbush. Photo: Todd Moe

Loans up to $40,000 available for NC maple producers

Many North Country Maple producers can now tap into a new loan fund to help them increase the amount of syrup they produce. The Development authority of the North Country, or DANC, set up the program after several studies showed most maple trees in the area aren't being tapped. That means producers are missing out on a lot of potential revenue. Nora Flaherty has the details.  Go to full article
Hugh Newton inspects a vacuum pump system in his sugarbush near Parishville.
Hugh Newton inspects a vacuum pump system in his sugarbush near Parishville.

Maple syrup: a mud season harvest

The pails are up and the sap is flowing. Weather plays a large part in the making of maple syrup. Last year's early spring ended the syrup production season abruptly in some parts of the state. Entering this year's maple syrup season, which usually runs from early March to mid-April, maple producers are eager to put last year behind them. Todd Moe spoke with a couple of syrup producers who say conditions are ideal for the start of the North Country's sweetest season.  Go to full article

Maple syrup season underway

The maple syrup season is underway across much of the North Country. It's already been a great season for some producers. Mike Farrell, Director of the Uihlein Maple Research Station in Lake Placid, knows maple syrup. 5,500 maples are tapped at Uihlien. You might say this is his season. Farrell studies the economic trends of maple syrup, how climate change is affecting the season and promotes maple syrup production in the region. He spoke with Todd Moe.  Go to full article

Bringing spring indoors

Martha Foley and horticulturist Amy Ivy share tips and ideas on forcing birch, cherry and maple cuttings to bloom indoors this season.  Go to full article
One of the 5,500 sap buckets at Yancey's Sugarbush near Croghan.
One of the 5,500 sap buckets at Yancey's Sugarbush near Croghan.

Gearing up for another season of sap

It's only a couple of weeks until the sap starts flowing from maple trees across the North Country. And maple producers are getting ready. Todd Moe talks with a fifth generation maple producer in Lewis County.  Go to full article
The Uihlein Maple Research Station, Lake Placid. Photo: Brian Chabot
The Uihlein Maple Research Station, Lake Placid. Photo: Brian Chabot

Study looks at climate change and maple season

Six North Country maple producers are working with Cornell University researchers on climate change and its effects on the industry. The climate patterns producing warmer winter weather and increased thawing in January are causing some maple producers to test their taps earlier in the winter. Todd Moe spoke with Mike Farrell, Director of the Uihlein Maple Research Station in Lake Placid, about climate warming and maple production. Will the North Country's annual Maple Weekend in 2080 be held in mid-January?  Go to full article

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