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News stories tagged with "marcellus-shale"

Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

NY will miss fracking rules deadline

New York State's Department of Environmental Conservation confirms it will miss a key deadline and delay approval of hydrofracking in New York once again.

Anti-fracking forces see an opportunity in the likely new delay, while those waiting to benefit economically from the gas drilling process are feeling frustrated.  Go to full article
Workers at a Cabot Oil & Gas drilling site in Susquehanna County, Pa. Photo: Matt Richmond, Innovation Trail
Workers at a Cabot Oil & Gas drilling site in Susquehanna County, Pa. Photo: Matt Richmond, Innovation Trail

New fracking method uses propane, not water

In the debate over whether hydraulic fracturing should be allowed in New York State, the need for millions of gallons of water at each well is a major concern.

A Canadian company called Gasfrac has developed a fracking method that eliminates the need for all that water. But as the Innovation Trail's Matt Richmond reports it's still too early to tell whether it will make a dent in a crowded industry.  Go to full article
Martens: We encouraged them not to adopt the regulations in the first instance.

Decision gives state more time on fracking rules

A major decision about the future of hydro-fracking in the Northeast has been postponed. The delay gives states, including New York, more time to consider their own fracking regulations. WMHT's Marie Cusick reports for the Innovation Trail.  Go to full article
Shale gas areas in the Northeast. Source: Wikipedia Commons
Shale gas areas in the Northeast. Source: Wikipedia Commons

First fracking hearing draws hundreds

Groups for and against the natural gas drilling process called hydro-fracking plan media events in Binghamton today, the second day of state hearings on proposed regulations.

Fracking involves injecting millions of gallons of chemical-laced water into a gas well to free gas from dense shale underground. The state hasn't issued permits for drilling in the lucrative shale formation in southern New York since 2008, when it began reviewing the controverisal process.

The Department of Environmental Conservation held the first of four public hearings on hydrofracking yesterday. As the Innovation Trail's Zack Seward reports, the majority of the 800 or so people who came to the small town of Dansville for the hearing were against hydrofracking.  Go to full article

Hearings begin - back and forth of fracking continues

New York begins public hearings on proposed regulations for hydro-fracking today. The state Department of Environmental Conservation convenes the first of the hearings in the Finger Lakes village of Dansville this afternoon at 1:00 pm. People hoping for three minutes to comment are expected to begin lining up hours before that.

The state has put off permits for drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation since 2008, when it began a review of the high-volume hydraulic fracturing process used to blast wells into production.

Environmental groups who fear the drilling will contaminate water supplies call the rules too lax.
The gas industry says the rules will be so restrictive that companies will avoid New York. As the DEC begins its hearings, an industry group has been holding public meetings of its own.  Go to full article

NY hydrofracking hearings set to start

The Department of Environmental Conservation begins holding hearings on the rules that would govern hydrofracking this week.

New Yorkers have watched closely as "fracking" has unfolded in Pennsylvania. Some are wary that environmental abuses could happen here. Others are eager for the economic boom drilling for the natural gas in the Marcellus Shale could bring.  Go to full article
A hydrofracking tower. (Photo: Innovation Trail)
A hydrofracking tower. (Photo: Innovation Trail)

DEC takes next step in hydro-fracking rules

New York environmental regulators have formally issued proposed regulations for hydraulic fracturing. Drilling companies want to "hydro-frack" the Marcellus Shale region of southern New York. The Department of Environmental Conservation has scheduled four public hearings on the proposed rules.

The document, originally posted online in July, outlines regulations for companies that want to "hydrofrack". It's a process where water, chemicals, and sand are pumped at high pressure deep into wells to release natural gas from the bedrock.

New York hasn't allowed "hydrofracking'' in the Marcellus Shale over the past three years and it won't be allowed until the process completes its new permitting rules.

Dennis Holbrook is vice president of the North Exploration, with offices outside of Buffalo. He's been drilling in New York for twenty years and is glad the process is moving forward.

Claire Sandberg is with the group Frack Action. She says even though New York looked at problems in Pennsylvania and other states before drafting its rules, environmentalists have many reasons to be concerned. Julie Grant has more.  Go to full article

DEC to look at fracking in flood areas

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation says it may now reconsider which areas in the Marcellus shale are deemed flood plains, in the light of recent catastrophic flooding. But the department says it will not delay the environmental review of fracking over the issue. (see related story)

Karen DeWitt has the DEC response.  Go to full article
The public is open minded to the notion of economic development opportunities, especially in New Yorkís Southern Tier.

DEC issues hydrofracking assessment, seeks comments

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced it will lengthen the public comment period on its final draft environmental impact statement for hydraulic fracturing. The comment period will be extended from 60 to 90 days and the DEC will hold four public hearings. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article
We said no we donít want anything to do with it. And he turned around and said, "It doesnít matter, Iíll get it anyway"

Landmen, part 2: Gray area in state law can undercut landowner

Yesterday we heard a cautionary story about "landmen" - the people who handle drilling leases and mineral rights for natural gas companies. Today, a state law some say is being used to force property-owners to sign on the dotted line.

Most people agree it's wrong to just take someone's property and give it to someone else. But there's a gray area in the rules for natural gas drilling. It's called compulsory integration.
Emma Jacobs has this report for the Innovation Trail.  Go to full article

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