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News stories tagged with "massena"

Ogdensburg Bridge & Port Authority director, Wade Davis, and Assemblywoman Addie Russell show U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer the plans for extending the runway, indicated in blue on the diagram. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Ogdensburg Bridge & Port Authority director, Wade Davis, and Assemblywoman Addie Russell show U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer the plans for extending the runway, indicated in blue on the diagram. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Schumer: Ogdensburg airport ok "waiting on someone's desk"

The city of Ogdensburg is getting ready to take off into a bigger air travel market. The Ogdensburg airport signed a contract last month with Allegiant Air to fly 170-passenger jet planes on and off of its runway. Officials expect the new service will attract tens of thousands of Canadian passengers and become a new economic driver.

The problem is...the runway is too short.

The airport has submitted a $12-15 million plan to build a longer runway. But it's stalled in Washington. Yesterday, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer came in person to say he's going to expedite the process.  Go to full article
A map of the Mohawk land claim.
A map of the Mohawk land claim.

Franklin County has the next move in Mohawk land claim deal

A federal appeals board has ruled the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe can make 39 acres of land it owns part of the Akwesasne reservation.

The tribe has used the land as a garbage transfer station for more than a decade. But it's technically within the borders of Franklin County, just west of the town of Fort Covington. The tribe originally petitioned to have the parcel added to the reservation seven years ago.

The details of the transfer will remain unclear until Franklin County decides what to do about a proposed settlement to the larger Mohawk land claim. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Green groups are hoping the new water levels plan improves wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf
Green groups are hoping the new water levels plan improves wetlands along the St. Lawrence River. Photo: Jenni Werndorf

After decades, major breakthrough on water levels for Lake Ontario, St. Lawrence

Standing between Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River is a dam that a lot of people say operates under outdated rules.

The regulations for the Moses-Saunders Dam between Cornwall and Massena haven't changed since the 1950s. For over a decade, lawmakers and activists have said that the rules on water levels have harmed wetlands, fish and wildlife, and even the tourism economy.

They've tried and failed to find a way of reversing that damage. Last year, officials came up with a new concept, called Plan 2014. Yesterday the International Joint Commission unanimously endorsed it.  Go to full article
St. Regis Mohawk chiefs Ron LaFrance, Beverly Cook, and sub-chief Eric Thompson are hoping to build support for the land claim settlement among tribal members. Photo: David Sommerstein.
St. Regis Mohawk chiefs Ron LaFrance, Beverly Cook, and sub-chief Eric Thompson are hoping to build support for the land claim settlement among tribal members. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Mohawk chiefs: "The most important thing is our land"

Mohawks in Akwesasne are trying to absorb the terms of a deal to end their historic land claim.

Last week, tribal chiefs signed a framework agreement with New York State and St. Lawrence County. It would allow the Mohawks to buy almost 5,000 acres of land and add the parcels to the reservation. In return, the Mohawks will pay a share of their casino revenue to New York. And St. Lawrence County and the towns of Massena and Brasher will share a payment of $4 million a year.

Talks are ongoing with Franklin County, where several thousand more acres are part of the 32-year-old land claim lawsuit.

The proposed settlement is huge news in Akwesasne. And it's very controversial. David Sommerstein and Martha Foley sort out why.  Go to full article
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders broke ground at the Massena East plant last July, but Alcoa still hasn't committed to completing the construction project. The plant has since closed, at least temporarily. Photo: Julie Grant
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders broke ground at the Massena East plant last July, but Alcoa still hasn't committed to completing the construction project. The plant has since closed, at least temporarily. Photo: Julie Grant

Is Alcoa committed to its future in Massena?

One of the North Country's largest private sector employers, Alcoa, is stepping back on its commitment to Massena. But the aluminum giant still got a $30 million discount from the state on its electricity bill. That's the crux of a story WWNY-TV broke earlier this week.

Since Alcoa shuttered its East plant in Massena in January, state officials have been scrambling to rework a deal that would have guaranteed 900 jobs in exchange for cheap electricity from the hydropower dam New York owns on the St. Lawrence River. The company also said it would invest $600 million to modernize the East plant with a new high-tech smelter. But Alcoa's board has yet to sign off on that plan.  Go to full article
Brett Bouchard was cleaning an industrial pasta maker at an Italian restaurant in Massena, New York, when the machine turned on and his arm got caught. Photo: Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe/Pool
Brett Bouchard was cleaning an industrial pasta maker at an Italian restaurant in Massena, New York, when the machine turned on and his arm got caught. Photo: Josh Reynolds for The Boston Globe/Pool

Massena 17 year-old doing well with re-attached arm

Four weeks ago Friday, a med flight helicopter landed at Massachusetts General Hospital, carrying a 17-year Massena boy.

It was just after midnight. A hastily assembled team of surgeons, nurses and anesthetists was waiting to try to reattach Brett Bouchard's right arm, ripped off just below the elbow.

WBUR's Martha Bebinger picks up the story.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/garysoup/367513235/">Gary Stevens</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Gary Stevens, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Massena responds to dirty needle discoveries

Massena's chief of police, Tim Currier, says he is looking into programs that would encourage safe disposal of used syringes. The syringes are a biohazard; sometimes they transmit diseases like Hepatitis C or HIV.

Last month, Massena police officers responded to 11 calls from people who found used syringes in public: in a park, near a school, and on Main Street.  Go to full article
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Alcoa reduces Massena workforce to 750

Alcoa has reached an agreement with New York State to keep its low cost power contract and proceed with a plan to build a new modern potline at its East plant in Massena.

But in the interim, the aluminum giant will reduce its workforce to 750 jobs, below the 900 job threshold it promised three years ago.  Go to full article
The new, low-level bridge going up last summer underneath the old span to Cornwall. Photo: Mohawk Council of Akwesasne  Communications.
The new, low-level bridge going up last summer underneath the old span to Cornwall. Photo: Mohawk Council of Akwesasne Communications.

New Cornwall bridge opens, but it still feels closed to Mohawks

Friday at 7am, Canada opens a new bridge across the St. Lawrence River to Cornwall. Officials said the $75 million project will speed up travel and contribute to economic growth.

The port-of-entry into Canada has been plagued by long wait times since it was moved off Cornwall Island four years ago.

But Akwesasne Mohawks say the new bridge won't make traffic move faster. And they say the new bridge won't do anything to ease travel between Mohawk communities divided by the international border. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders break ground at the Massena East plant last July. Photo: Julie Grant
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders break ground at the Massena East plant last July. Photo: Julie Grant

Alcoa, Cuomo cite "good first steps" on cutbacks in Massena

Governor Cuomo's top aides say they had "a positive conversation" in New York City yesterday with officials from Alcoa. But they repeated warnings that the aluminum giant has to honor its contract with the state.

The emergency meeting came the day after the aluminum giant announced it will close the two remaining pot lines at its East plant in Massena by the spring. Alcoa is trying to streamline in the wake of poor earnings reports and a weak aluminum market. More than 300 jobs are at stake.

David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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