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News stories tagged with "massena"

Mountain Mart in Canton, NY. According to EPA data, the agency found violations at seven gas stations in Malone, Massena, Moira, Plattsburgh, and Canton. Photo: David Sommerstein
Mountain Mart in Canton, NY. According to EPA data, the agency found violations at seven gas stations in Malone, Massena, Moira, Plattsburgh, and Canton. Photo: David Sommerstein

Adk Energy to pay $112,000 to prevent underground gas leaks

A Malone-based company will have to install new equipment to detect leaks at gas stations it owns across the North Country. Federal officials already fined Adirondack Energy $46,000.  Go to full article
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein

Mohawks rip EPA's Grasse River cleanup plan

Update: The EPA released its final plan for the Alcoa Grasse River cleanup late this morning. More information is at The Inbox.

Just ahead of the release of a plan to clean up toxic chemicals from the Grasse River near Massena, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe blasted federal officials for putting the economy ahead of the environment.  Go to full article
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein

Alcoa commits to 900 jobs in Massena; Grasse cleanup still in flux

The company that built Massena will keep its plants open there for at least another 30 years.

Alcoa announced Saturday it will invest $42 million to modernize its East plant and build a new smelting the line. The company will also guarantee at least 900 jobs. In return, Alcoa will get low cost electricity from the hydropower dam on the St. Lawrence River.

The deal hinges on how the Environmental Protection Agency decides to clean up PCBs Alcoa and Reynolds dumped in the Grasse River decades ago.

David Sommerstein joined Martha Foley for more on the deal.  Go to full article
Part of the area to be cleaned up by Perras Environmental Control.  Photo: David Sommerstein.
Part of the area to be cleaned up by Perras Environmental Control. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Massena firm wins GM cleanup bid

A local environmental firm was selected for the next cleanup phase of General Motors' contaminated site in Massena.  Go to full article
Mohawks on Cornwall Island waited to march in support of the Idle No More movement...  Photo: David Sommerstein.
Mohawks on Cornwall Island waited to march in support of the Idle No More movement... Photo: David Sommerstein.

Mohawks march for indigenous solidarity

Akwesasne Mohawks sent the Canadian government a message of native unity on Saturday. Hundreds of people marched across the two bridges from Massena, NY, to Cornwall, Ontario. Several tribal chiefs were among the marchers.

The demonstration was part of a movement called "Idle No More" that's swept across Canada. It protests legislation that many First Nation people say threatens their land and water.

The protest closed the border crossing for several hours. Despite a history of clashes with border officials, the march was a peaceful, family affair, full of drumming and singing.  Go to full article
A protestor at the Idle No More round dance at the Canadian Embassy, Washington DC. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jonathonreed/"> Jonathon Reed</a> CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
A protestor at the Idle No More round dance at the Canadian Embassy, Washington DC. Photo: Jonathon Reed CC some rights reserved

Mohawks plan march on international bridge

A group of Mohawks is planning to march on the bridge to Canada near Massena, NY, and shut down traffic Saturday. The demonstration is a part of an indigenous rights movement that's spread across Canada.  Go to full article
The mobile poultry slaughterhouse under construction. Photo courtesy <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/North-Country-Pastured-LLC/327773893911612">North Country Pastured</a>
The mobile poultry slaughterhouse under construction. Photo courtesy North Country Pastured

Chicken processors nearly on line

Almost ten years ago, a visiting speaker at St. Lawrence University planted a seed. Economist Michael Shuman told an audience that farmers could jolt the North Country economy by producing a lot more meat. "You have a lot more room to produce your own beef cows," Shuman told the Burt Symposium in 2003. "You could produce a lot more of your own pigs. And chickens are not even in the game."

Community leaders have recalled that advice, to have the thousands of local residents who eat chicken buy it from a local farm, many times since.

The idea is about to bear fruit. The first USDA certified poultry slaughterhouses in the North Country are nearly set to begin production.  Go to full article
The former General Motors site in Massena today. Photo: RACER Trust
The former General Motors site in Massena today. Photo: RACER Trust

Massena GM redevelopers "confident" of sale

The biggest cleanup in the country of former General Motors property is underway in Massena. Crews are removing more than 100,000 tons of concrete and soil contaminated by toxic PCB oils.

The cleanup won't be finished for another three years. But the federally appointed trust that owns the property is already bullish on selling it.  Go to full article
Part of the 7.2 mi. contaminated stretch of the Grasse.  Photo by David Sommerstein.
Part of the 7.2 mi. contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo by David Sommerstein.

Mohawks seek better Grasse cleanup

The St. Regis Mohawks say the federal government's plan to clean up toxic chemicals from the Grasse River has improved, but it's still not good enough. The Alcoa aluminum plant in Massena dumped cancer-causing PCBs into the river before they were banned in the 1970s.  Go to full article
The Hogansburg Triangle is in pink on this map.
The Hogansburg Triangle is in pink on this map.

Judge sustains part of Mohawk land claim

Native tribes' claims to ancestral lands in New York haven't fared so well recently. In 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court essentially dismissed the Oneida Nation's land claim, saying too much time had passed since the 18th century treaties the claims are based on. Other courts have followed that ruling with other tribes' land claims.

So this week, when a judge recommended throwing out 85% of the Mohawk land claim in St. Lawrence and Franklin counties, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe focused on the 15% that has a chance to survive. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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