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News stories tagged with "meat"

The mobile poultry slaughterhouse under construction. Photo courtesy <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/North-Country-Pastured-LLC/327773893911612">North Country Pastured</a>
The mobile poultry slaughterhouse under construction. Photo courtesy North Country Pastured

Chicken processors nearly on line

Almost ten years ago, a visiting speaker at St. Lawrence University planted a seed. Economist Michael Shuman told an audience that farmers could jolt the North Country economy by producing a lot more meat. "You have a lot more room to produce your own beef cows," Shuman told the Burt Symposium in 2003. "You could produce a lot more of your own pigs. And chickens are not even in the game."

Community leaders have recalled that advice, to have the thousands of local residents who eat chicken buy it from a local farm, many times since.

The idea is about to bear fruit. The first USDA certified poultry slaughterhouses in the North Country are nearly set to begin production.  Go to full article
Chowing down.<br />Photo courtesy of Mike Shawl
Chowing down.
Photo courtesy of Mike Shawl

Good Eats at Lake Placid BBQ Festival

Hot and spicy was the order of the day at the Lake Placid 5th annual I Love Barbecue Festival to benefit the Shipman Youth Center. Competitors braved high temperatures for three days as they cooked up some delicious meat. Sarah Harris visited the festival, sampled delectable barbecued chicken and has our story.  Go to full article
Student Tom Acampora wants to butcher hogs at his own slaughterhouse.
Student Tom Acampora wants to butcher hogs at his own slaughterhouse.

Training the next generation of butchers

Mostly gone are the days of the neighborhood butcher. They may never come back. They've been replaced by vast meat processing plants putting out shrink-wrapped cuts for supermarkets. But foodies and locavores are fueling a demand for meat raised, killed, and butchered closer to home. The problem in the North Country and much of the Northeast is there aren't enough slaughterhouses or meat cutters. David Sommerstein visited New York's only certification course for the next generation of butchers.  Go to full article
Jeff Liberty, the next generation of Tri-Town Packing in Brasher Falls.  But there's too much paperwork and not enough skilled meat cutters.
Jeff Liberty, the next generation of Tri-Town Packing in Brasher Falls. But there's too much paperwork and not enough skilled meat cutters.

A good knifeman is hard to find

The "buy and eat local" movement continues to grow. In at least one instance, it's struggling with success. More people are eating local beef, lamb, and other meats for health, safety and economic reasons. And more farmers are raising the animals. But in between consumer and producer, there's a shortage of slaughterhouses. Local abattoirs used to dot the North Country landscape. But consolidation in the food industry and onerous USDA regulations have pushed many out of business. Another problem is a lack of skilled meat cutters. In part two of a series on the slaughterhouse shortage, David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Bison farmer Dale Healey ran short of product because his slaughterhouse was booked.
Bison farmer Dale Healey ran short of product because his slaughterhouse was booked.

Local meat boom exposes slaughterhouse shortage

Tonight, local beef, lamb, and pork farmers are gathering at Cornell Cooperative Extension in Canton to discuss a problem that they're happy to have. Increased interest in local grass-fed and free range meat has created a shortage of slaughterhouses in the North Country and across the Northeast. There are only three USDA-certified abattoirs in northern New York, two in St. Lawrence County and one near Saratoga Springs. As David Sommerstein reports, meat processors see a big opportunity and a big risk.

The Cornell Cooperative Extension of St. Lawrence County is hosting a meeting tonight at 7 to discuss the shortage of slaughterhouse facilities in the region.

One note to this story: bison farmer Dale Healey is retiring, but he says it had nothing to do with the slaughterhouse shortage.  Go to full article
Brian Doxtater has re-opened his family's grocery as an indoor farmers market.
Brian Doxtater has re-opened his family's grocery as an indoor farmers market.

Reviving the local grocer, with local food

Drive through almost any hamlet or four corners in the North Country, and you will likely see a shuttered family grocer. The little shops were once the hub of gossip and community activity, as well as shopping for essentials, before they were eclipsed by chains of gas station convenience stores. A man in Jefferson County is reviving his family's grocery store in Pamelia Corners. In the process, he's giving local farmers an outlet for their products in the cold months between farmers' markets. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Stores required to label some foods

Starting this week, supermarkets are officially required to tell you where some of your meat and produce comes from. But as Rebecca Williams reports, it can get confusing at the store.  Go to full article

A new approach to dairy farming

Some cutting edge farmers are stepping away from concentrating on only production of meat and milk on their farms. They're starting to focus on ways to give their animals healthy, long lives. And they're finding more benefits than they ever imagined. Kinna Ohman reports.  Go to full article
Kassandra Barton of The 8 O'Clock Ranch is just as comfortable online as at the farmers' market.
Kassandra Barton of The 8 O'Clock Ranch is just as comfortable online as at the farmers' market.

Local Flavor: local meat in town and online

When it comes to healthy, environmentally-friendly eating, "local" has become the new "organic." More and more people want to know what's in their food, who produced it, and how far it traveled to get to the dinner table. Community Supported Agriculture, or CSAs, are a growing way to bring consumers and farmers closer. Think of a CSA as a subscription service for food. A farm in St. Lawrence County is just as comfortable marketing its CSA on the Internet as at the local farmers' market. As David Sommerstein reports, The 8 O'Clock Ranch is challenging what it means to "eat local."  Go to full article

Feedlot, ethanol plant plan draws critics

A New York City-based firm is pushing ahead on a project that would combine a massive feedlot with alternative energy in St. Lawrence County. Bion Environmental Technologies touts an environmentally friendly way to raise 84,000 beef cattle and produce ethanol in the process. The project would be the first of its kind in the country. Many community leaders see the $200 million project as an economic boon and an environmental model. But a growing number of critics say the "green" promises are too good to believe. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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