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News stories tagged with "meet-the-masters"

Martha Cooper photo
Martha Cooper photo

Meet the Masters: Storyteller Catherine Charron

Long before Walt Disney and Steven Spielberg, before videos and TVs, storytelling happened the old fashioned way; one person sat down with another and talked. Catherine Charron grew up near Lake Champlain in a household full of storytellers. Lamar Bliss reports for Traditional Arts in Upstate New York about Charron's family and where Catherine is telling stories now.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Harmonica Man Fred V. Higby

Fred V. Higby plays the harmonica. He figured out how to play when he was 10, played it all over Europe during World War II, and he still plays as often as he has the opportunity. It isn't simply playing the harmonica that he loves, it's performing. It's getting people excited about the music he plays, about making them feel happy. Music will do that. Just ask Fred. Lamar Bliss has this story.  Go to full article
Don Perkins was a recent visitor to the NCPR studio.
Don Perkins was a recent visitor to the NCPR studio.

Meet the Masters: The Perkins Family Band

Meet the Perkins Family from Plattsburgh. Lois Perkins is now in her 90s and has passed the love of music and dancing she gained from her father and her husband on to her children and grandchildren. The family band plays the fiddle music Lois loved as a child and lots of bluegrass tunes for festivals and other gatherings. Lamar Bliss introduces us to this musical family.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Fran Betters, Guide and Teacher

If you want to have a successful fly-fishing trip to the Ausable River, you might want to stop in at the Adirondack Sport shop just outside of Wilmington. Francis Betters will be there and he'll know what insects are hatching, and near which rocks the biggest fish are waiting. He's been fishing this river since he was a boy, and he knows each rapid and pool. He's also learned that there's more to fishing than fishing. Lamar Bliss has this Meet the Masters profile.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Fran Betters, Fly-Tyer

Anyone with an eye for beauty can appreciate the sight of a well-tied fishing fly. A little piece of feather here, a bit of fur there all to lure in the hungry trout. Where did these designs come from? Do they work? Fran Betters of Wilmington has spent years studying the insects he's imitating when he constructs an Ausable Wulff fly, one of the many successful flys he's designed. Lamar Bliss reports.  Go to full article

Meet The Masters: The Hammond Fair

Meet the Masters takes you to a small-town agricultural fair held in Hammond each September. There are chickens, sheep, cows, horses, geese, rabbits, kids and young farmers; an egg toss, a pie-eating contest, the chicken barbeque--all a part of celebrating the town's farming heritage. Lamar Bliss reports.  Go to full article
Earl Sprague, with a replica of Champ.
Earl Sprague, with a replica of Champ.

Meet the Masters: Earl Sprague and Champ, the Lake Champlain Monster

How does a town go about claiming a sea monster as a resident? It helps if you have a woodworker with a workshop, especially if the woodworker has seen Champ, the Lake Champlain Monster. Earl Sprague helped the Port Henry Chamber of Commerce give a shape to the seldom-seen monster and he tells us all about seeing Champ and about some of the adventures his plywood Champs have had. Lamar Bliss reports.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: Tupper Lake Synagogue

The Jewish Synagogue in Tupper Lake had been closed up for decades when a summer resident asked to take a look inside. What she found was a national treasure and she did the work to get it recognized by the National Register of Historic Places. Long-time residents whose fathers had built the structure came together with others to restore it for their community. It's the story of one building and four women. Lamar Bliss reports.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: The Redford Picnic

Redford, New York is a tiny blip on the map today but, like many Adirondack towns, it has been through periods of boom and bust. During a boom time, in the mid 1800s the Roman Catholics came together and built a church which was consecrated on August 15, 1855. Ever since then parishioners take a day in August to get together for the Redford Picnic. The event has become a fundraiser for the church and parochial school, but for the families that have been attending for generation after generation it is much more. Lamar Bliss attended last year's picnic.  Go to full article

Meet the Masters: The Redford Carousel

In a corrugated metal shed 60 yards from the Church of the Assumption in Redford, New York sits one of the few early merry-go-rounds or carousels made by the Armitage-Hershell company that is still in operation. No one can say precisely how or when it ended up in Redford. It only operates two days out of the year but it is a part of the life of this community and brings the generations together. Lamar Bliss reports.  Go to full article

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