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News stories tagged with "mercury"

Market-based Approach to Mercury Reductions

For the first time, the U.S. government is preparing to regulate mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Part of the administration's proposal is to use a market-based approach, called "cap-and-trade." People in the energy business say "cap-and-trade" programs are proven tools to protect the environment at a lower cost. But some critics say a pollutant as toxic as mercury should have a more traditional and tougher regulatory program. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Erin Toner reports.  Go to full article

FDA to Revise Fish Consumption Advisories

The Food and Drug Administration is going back to square one in its attempt to come up with guidelines for fish consumption. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

EPA Changes Mercury Rules

The new chief of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is introducing rules for reducing mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. But environmentalists and others say the rules actually rollback provisions in the Clean Air Act. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article

Congressman Takes On Mercury Emissions

A Republican congressman is calling for stricter control of mercury emissions. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

Poll: Toxic Chemicals Big Issue With Voters

A poll released Thursday finds a majority of voters are very concerned about the most dangerous toxic chemicals, like mercury, dioxin, and PCBs. Environmentalists see the poll as a mandate for elected officials to pass laws removing the chemicals from air and water. David Sommerstein has more.  Go to full article

The Complexities of Issuing Fish Advisories

There are three major questions often asked when considering the environmental health of a body of water. Can you drink the water? Can you swim in it? And, can you eat the fish? Often the answer to the last question is very complicated. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

Study: High Mercury Levels in Adirondack Loons

The final report from a study of mercury levels in Adirondack loons is out. It finds that 17 percent of the birds scientists sampled last summer had high enough levels of mercury to affect their reproduction and behavior. The findings suggest that acid rain's effects on the Adirondack Park have spread throughout the food chain. But the long term effects are still to be determined. Brian Mann was with the researchers late last summer, and reported on what were then the preliminary findings.  Go to full article

Loon Mercury Study Final Report

Martha Foley talks with Adirondack loon researcher Nina Schoch about the final report from the loon and mercury study, other threats to loons in the Adirondacks, and a census coming up later this month.  Go to full article

Coal Burning Power Plant Buys Out Angry Neighbors

Coal burning power plants in the Midwest are considered the number one cause of acid rain. Smokestacks pump out tons of sulfur and mercury that drifts north and east, poisoning Adirondack lakes and forests. The toxic pollution is also a threat to small towns that neighbor the power plants. Last summer, "blue clouds of sulfur gas" blanketed the village of Cheshire, Ohio. But rather than clean up their emissions, the utility company has agreed to a surprising solution. American Electric Power is buying the entire town for twenty million dollars. Natalie Walston explains.  Go to full article

Loon Study

Researchers in the Adirondacks are working to learn more about the common loon. The latest field study is raising questions about mercury contamination in the lakes and ponds where the loons live. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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