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News stories tagged with "mexico"

A "Dia de los muertos" altar at SLU's Herring-Cole Hall
A "Dia de los muertos" altar at SLU's Herring-Cole Hall

SLU observes "Day of the Dead"

The day after Halloween is traditionally consider "All Saints Day", among Christians. In Mexico, many observe an ancient Aztec celebration of the memory of deceased ancestors. The "Day of the Dead" is also celebrated in many Mexican-American communities. Todd Moe stopped by during preparations for a campus celebration at St. Lawrence University.  Go to full article

Small protest to hispanic laborers

There's been little public opposition in the North Country to the growing number of Hispanic workers on dairy farms. But earlier this month, a small group protested outside the St. Lawrence County Farm Bureau's "A Day at the Farm" event at Jon Greenwood's dairy in Canton. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

Mexican corridos: the people's autobiography in song

A St. Lawrence University professor specializes in a genre of Mexican music that tells the stories of how migrant workers get to the United States. Martha Chew-Sanchez is the author of a book called Corridos in Migrant Memory. She's invited a Mexican band, Los Inalcanzables to perform "corridos" tonight at 7 at SLU's Student Center. "Corridos" are epic songs that were first sung when the Spanish arrived in the New World. They're like the collective autobiography of Mexico, telling stories about everything from farming and famous heroes to drug smuggling and crossing the border. New ones are always written to reflect contemporary lives. Chew-Sanchez told David Sommerstein she grew up in the border region of El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico, where "corridos" told the stories of the day...  Go to full article

Guard Heads To Mexico Border

The Glens Falls Post Star is reporting this morning that National Guardsmen from the North Country will be sent to Arizona to help patrol the US-Mexico border. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Farmers on the Wrong Side of the Law

Over the last five years, the number of Mexican and Central Americans working on the North Country's dairy farms has risen dramatically. Industry leaders agree farms depend on reliable, plentiful Hispanic labor to survive. If national estimates are right, about three-quarters of these workers entered the United States illegally. Farmers are not required to prove their workers are legal. In fact, they can be sued for discrimination if they challenge them. Still, dairy farmers find themselves on the wrong side of immigration law as it now stands. David Sommerstein has part two of our series, Latinos on the Farm.  Go to full article

Web Only: Farmworker Legal Services of NY

Listen to David Sommerstein's interview with Jim Schmidt, co-director of Farmworker Legal Services of New York, based in Rochester. He talks about the common abuses Hispanic migrant farmworkers face in New York.  Go to full article

Mexican Farm Workers Arrested en Route to Lowville

State Police in Oneida County arrested 10 illegal Mexican immigrants yesterday. Troopers responded to a vehicle that had slid off of Route 12. David Sommerstein spoke with Sergeant Kevin Maxwell. He said police from Utica who spoke Spanish helped find out the nine men and one woman were on their way to a farm in the Lowville area. He didn't know which farm. None of the Mexicans had identification. Maxwell says they were packed into a pick-up truck.  Go to full article
Carrie Baker's emotional encounter with the mother of Gabriel, her employee.
Carrie Baker's emotional encounter with the mother of Gabriel, her employee.

Farmers Seek Workers' Roots - in Mexico

Five years ago, just a handful of dairy farmers in the North Country employed Hispanic workers. Today, some 50 farms use or have expressed a desire to hire workers from Mexico or Guatemala. The transition can be a bumpy one, for farmers and for the people they hire. There are the obvious language barriers, but also issues with food and housing and cultural norms. Earlier this month, a small group of farmers tried to bridge that gap in a big way. They took a trip to Mexico, to the very village where their employees come from, and met their families. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Hispanic Dairy Workers in New York: The Bigger Picture

Agricultural labor specialist Tom Maloney of Cornell University completed a survey of Hispanic workers on New York dairy farms earlier this year. Many of these workers came into the United States illegally. The survey found crossing the border, language barriers, and lack of freedom are the biggest challenges they face in their work. Their employers also cite language and immigration issues as problems. Maloney told David Sommerstein dairy farmers are increasingly turning to Hispanic labor because they struggle to find employees at a price they can pay.  Go to full article
Activist Martha Ojeda
Activist Martha Ojeda

A Voice of the 'Outsourced'

Widespread concern over the outsourcing of jobs to other countries has put free trade agreements like NAFTA at the center of the political debate in America. One product of NAFTA has been a vast corporate industrial zone along the U.S.-Mexico border, where low wages, intense pollution, birth defects and other health problems are well-documented. The factories there are called 'maquiladoras'. David Sommerstein spoke with Martha Ojeda, a second generation maquiladora worker, who directs Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras. She is giving talks this week as a part of SUNY Potsdam's Crossing Borders festival. She describes conditions at a SONY factory she worked at in 1994, when the NAFTA agreement was signed.  Go to full article

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