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News stories tagged with "milk"

Cows grazing at Bob Zufall's farm in Lisbon, NY. Photo: David Pynchon
Cows grazing at Bob Zufall's farm in Lisbon, NY. Photo: David Pynchon

Two farms, two very different views on sustainability

The term sustainability is now commonplace. Everything from furniture, to travel, to shopping at Walmart is described as "sustainable." Usage has stretched so far that it's hard to say what "sustainability" really is.

Dictionary.com defines sustainability as "supporting long term ecological balance." And Wikipedia says it is "the capacity to endure." We visited two North Country dairy farms, each with a very different philosophy, but both claiming to be sustainable.  Go to full article
Sandy and Aaron Stauffer with their herd. Photo: Julie Grant
Sandy and Aaron Stauffer with their herd. Photo: Julie Grant

Why milk containers send mixed messages

When you go to the supermarket dairy aisle, there are so many milks to choose from: different brands, fat contents, and prices. One thing they all have in common is a label that says something like "our farmers pledge they do not inject their cows with artificial growth hormone." The containers also state that there's no difference in the milk from cows with or without those hormones.

So what's going on here? Why are our milk containers sending mixed messages? And what does it mean for North Country dairy farms that use growth hormones on their cows?  Go to full article
Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein
Hispanic men and women - some of them quite young - provide labor illegally on many dairy farms. Photo: David Sommerstein

Schumer says immigration bill will help NY dairy farms

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer says a new bipartisan immigration deal will provide an economic boost to New York farms and the agriculture industry.

In a press release, Schumer says the bill will be especially helpful to dairy farms and fruit growers.  Go to full article
Photo: Nora Flaherty
Photo: Nora Flaherty

Two new programs New York hopes will help dairy farmers

Governor Cuomo announced two new programs to help dairy farmers grow alongside the booming Greek yogurt business in New York.  Go to full article
Dairy cows at Greenwood Dairy, in Canton, NY. Photo: Nora Flaherty
Dairy cows at Greenwood Dairy, in Canton, NY. Photo: Nora Flaherty

Report says consolidation hurting farms and communities

It's a strange time for the North Country's dairy farmers.
On one hand, Congress' failure to pass a new farm bill has meant the loss of a safety net if milk prices drop or feed costs rise. On the other hand, the soaring popularity of Greek yogurt is offering what New York's dairy leaders call a "once in a generation" opportunity to shore up an industry that's been eroding for decades.

New York has lost about two-thirds of its dairy farms since the 1980s. The ones that remain have gotten bigger.  Go to full article

Plenty at stake in farm bill standoff

UPDATE: Thursday afternoon, the Wall Street Journal reports House Speaker John Boehner has officially confirmed that the farm bill won't be taken up until after the November elections.

North Country farmers are anxiously watching the status of the new farm bill in the House of Representatives. The current farm bill expires on September 30. The Senate passed a new five-year, $497 billion farm bill over the summer. But House leadership has yet to let its version come to the floor for a vote. "Tea Party" Republicans want to see much deeper cuts in the biggest item in the bill -- the federal food stamp program.

So what if the Farm Bill isn't passed by the end of the month? How would that affect North Country agriculture?  Go to full article
You can make cheese at home with just a few ingredients.
You can make cheese at home with just a few ingredients.

Raw milk and a favorite food: cheese

This week, we're listening again to a series we produced this summer titled, "Farmers Under 40", a look at the new generation of young farmers in the North Country. The series also celebrates locally grown food: vegetables, fruit, meat and dairy. So, what can you do with raw milk, besides drinking it? Think cheese.

Inspired by Barbara Kingsolver's book, Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, Todd Moe found it's pretty easy to make delicious soft cheese, with no special equipment and just a few key ingredients. He starts with a gallon of raw milk. Forty-five minutes later, he's got a softball sized piece of home made mozzarella. It begins on the farm...  Go to full article
New York has lost 23% of its dairy farms. Nearly one quarter of all our dairy farms.

Sen. Gillibrand says NY is losing dairy farms fast

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand says New York's dairy farmers can't wait for next year's Farm Bill negotiations to start fixing the milk price. In a telephone press conference with reporters, the Democrat said dairy farmers face "an urgent crisis". Todd Moe reports.  Go to full article
Ray Hill says the safety of raw milk depends on a farmer's integrity
Ray Hill says the safety of raw milk depends on a farmer's integrity

Raw milk debate, alive in the North Country

New restrictions on raw milk sales in Wisconsin and Massachusetts are returning one of America's fiercest food debates to the headlines. More people are seeking out unpasteurized milk. They cite a broad range of health benefits and support for local dairies. But health officials and many scientists insist drinking raw milk is too risky. Even Locavore-in-Chief Michael Pollan cautions raw milk drinkers "not to turn a blind eye to the food safety concerns." In New York, about 30 dairies are licensed to sell direct from the farm, including five in the North Country. The law requires consumers to bring their own containers and actually watch as the milk is poured from the bulk tank. David Sommerstein got an up-close look at the raw milk debate at a farm in St. Lawrence County and has our story.  Go to full article
You can make cheese at home with just a few ingredients.
You can make cheese at home with just a few ingredients.

Raw milk and a favorite food: cheese

So, what can you do with raw milk...besides drinking it? Think...cheese. Inspired by Barbara Kingsolver's book, "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle," Todd Moe found it's pretty easy to make delicious soft cheese, with no special equipment and just a few key ingredients. He starts with a gallon of raw milk. Forty-five minutes later, he's got a softball sized piece of home made mozzarella... It begins on the farm...  Go to full article

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