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News stories tagged with "milk"

A Regional Dairy Perspective for 2004

2003 was a surprisingly good year for dairy farmers in the North Country and around the Northeast. Crops grew well and the price farmers get paid for their milk rebounded after a two year slump. To get a forecast of the issues facing dairy in 2004, David Sommerstein spoke with Susan Harlow, managing editor of Northeast Dairy Business Magazine, a trade publication for dairy farmers in New York, New England, Pennsylvania and Maryland. She says the top issue will always be the price of milk.  Go to full article

Calcium Weighs In

The Jefferson County town of Calcium celebrated the dietary benefits of milk, cheese, and yogurt yesterday as a part of the national "Got Milk?" dairy campaign. About 150 people in the Watertown area spent 4 months on a high dairy, low calorie diet and lost an average of 14 pounds each. The diet was based on research by Dr. James Hill of the University of Colorado School of Nutrition, who found eating more calcium causes the body to burn more fat. David Sommerstein talked with participant Tony Bova.  Go to full article

Free Market Dairying

This week the National Milk Producers Federation and dozens of dairy farmer cooperatives nationwide began a program to control milk production in the United States and push up the price of milk. North Country Coops like Dairylea and Agrimark have agreed to participate. David Sommerstein talks with one farmer who disagrees with the program and thinks the free market works better.  Go to full article

Dairy Coops Leverage Market Power

Dairy farmers are taking an historic step toward controlling the supply of milk in the United States. Farmers accounting for 70 percent of the milk made nationally have banded together to cut production in order to raise the price they get paid. David Sommerstein reports most of the North Country's farmer cooperatives have signed on, but some farmers are wary.  Go to full article
Are soybeans a promising future for farmers like Bill Brewer?
Are soybeans a promising future for farmers like Bill Brewer?

Can Soybeans Take Root on North Country Farms?

Facing rock-bottom milk prices and mounting debt, dairy farmers are looking for other ways to stay in business. An extra field of hay or corn could help pay the bills in tight times.

Soybeans have been trumpeted as a promising alternative. In part two of our series on diversifying North Country agriculture, David Sommerstein reports soybeans will never be the staple crop they are in the Midwest, but they could be a part of a mix that redefines farming's future in the region.  Go to full article
Assemblyman Darrel Aubertine
Assemblyman Darrel Aubertine

Aubertine Touts Bills to Protect Real Milk

North Country Assemblyman Darrel Aubertine says two bills passed out of committee that he says would protect dairy farmers from powdered milk substitutes called milk protein concentrates, or MPCs.  Go to full article

U.S. Cracks Down on Dairy Imports

New York lawmakers are urging U.S. trade representatives to restrict dairy imports from Canada that compete with North Country dairy products. David Sommerstein reports they're making progress as low milk prices continue to hurt farmers.  Go to full article
Kevin Sullivan's greener pastures.
Kevin Sullivan's greener pastures.

Seasonal Dairying: A Viable Alternative

Most dairy farmers in the North Country milk their cows all year long. It brings in a steady paycheck and ensures a steady flow of milk to manufacturing plants. But a small but growing number give their cows a break during the coldest months. It's a technique called seasonal dairying. Its supporters say it's gentler on the cows, easier on the environment, and gives small dairy farms a future in an industry that's growing ever bigger. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Tina Montroy has worked at McCadam Cheese Co. in Heuvelton for 15 years.
Tina Montroy has worked at McCadam Cheese Co. in Heuvelton for 15 years.

Can Milk Producers & Processors Collaborate?

The North Country dairy industry is built on manufacturing. Most of the milk cows produce is turned into something else - cheese, butter, yogurt, milk powder. The relationship between dairy farmers and the processing plants they sell their milk to is a symbiotic one. But like all close relationships, there can be tension, even outright feuds. In the second part of our series on dairy in the North Country, David Sommerstein looks at the relationship from one processor's point of view, who says the future lies in the two groups becoming one.  Go to full article

Milk Price Drop Concerns Farm Leaders

The Vermont Milk Commission is deeply worried about the financial future of the state's dairy farmers. Jody Tosti reports.  Go to full article

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