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News stories tagged with "moose"

Cullen Rose of Inlet (left), his brother, Andy Quodomine of Clifton Park (center), and moose-calling contest emcee Ed Kanze (right). Photo: Andy Flynn
Cullen Rose of Inlet (left), his brother, Andy Quodomine of Clifton Park (center), and moose-calling contest emcee Ed Kanze (right). Photo: Andy Flynn

Moose callers gather in Indian lake

There are more moose living in the Adirondacks every year. Scientists put the population at about 800 this year.

One town is hoping its local moose will be a draw for visitors: Indian Lake is already capitalizing on moose tourism with an annual Moose Festival, which includes a moose calling contest.

But even with numbers up and moose sightings on the rise, nobody had reported seeing one on the first day of the Great Adirondack Moose Festival--except Bloomingdale resident Debbie Kanze.  Go to full article

New kids book features a friendly moose

Todd Moe talks with Ogdensburg author Cris Rishe about her book, There's a Moose on the Loose. It's the story of Horace T. Moose, an overly curious and friendly animal. She'll give a reading and sign copies of the book this Sunday afternoon (1-3 pm) at the Brewer Bookstore in Canton.  Go to full article
Aimee Hurt has trained dogs for conservation work for nine years
Aimee Hurt has trained dogs for conservation work for nine years

A dog's job: studying moose in the Adirondacks

Wildlife biologists say that New York state is home to more than 500 moose. Their population has surged in recent years. Researchers would like to know a lot more about the animals: what they're eating, where they're going, and why their numbers are growing so rapidly. A new project organized by the Wildlife Conservation Society aims to gather some of that data using trained tracking dogs. Brian Mann spent a day with a research team in the northern Adirondacks and has our story.  Go to full article

HUN: A moose that's the "Url" of Old Forge

Standing vigil on the front lawn of the Arts Center in Old Forge is a multi-colored moose statue. This dapper Adirondack icon has attracted the attention of summer visitors, arts patrons and politicians, and is today's "Heard Up North."  Go to full article
Adirondack moose cow and calf (Copyrighted photo courtesy of WCS)
Adirondack moose cow and calf (Copyrighted photo courtesy of WCS)

North Country moose population set to explode

A moose that was tranquilized and moved to a wilderness area after it wandered through Watertown was found dead a day after it was released. Stephen Litwhiler of the state Department of Environmental Conservation told the Associated Press that the 1200-pound bull moose was found dead on Sunday in the Five Ponds Wilderness Area. It will be examined to determine the cause of death. This is the breeding season, and bull moose are on the move looking for mates. Encounters between moose and humans are increasing in the region. Three moose have been hit by cars in the central Adirondacks in the last few weeks. Another was struck by a train in the eastern Adirondacks. Last week, a man was killed on I-93 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. when his car struck a bull moose. Ken Kogut is regional wildlife manager for New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, based in Ray Brook. He told Brian Mann that the moose population in northern New York has reached a tipping point and is expected to increase rapidly.

NOTE: The Wildlife Conservation Society is working with the DEC to collect information about encounters between humans and animals in the Adirondacks, with a focus on moose. If you've had a run-in with wildlife or want to find out more about the study, please click on the WCS link below.  Go to full article

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