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News stories tagged with "moving-the-world"

By car, tractor, donkey...and snowshoe. Photo by Carol Pynchon.
By car, tractor, donkey...and snowshoe. Photo by Carol Pynchon.

On the road: 'round the world hitchhiker pauses in the North Country

Frenchman Jeremy Marie is about halfway through his world tour. It's a slow trip. He figures it will take him five years, because he's hitchhiking, ride by ride, from his home in Normandy and back.

The 25 year-old has been through Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. He crossed the Atlantic by crewing on a catamaran from South Africa to Panama. The it was north through Central America, Mexico and the west coast to Alaska and across Canada. Now he's thumbing his way south through the U.S.

He's ridden in cars, trucks, on tractors and donkeys. His budget is seven dollars a day, and he's slept on people's couches, outdoors at gas stations in the middle of the desert -- anywhere he can find a bed.

This past week he's been on "pause" in the North Country, with home base in Canton. He says this is the coldest place he has been, but also one of the most hospitable. Martha Foley spoke with him after his talk at the Canton Rotary Club, on his first day in town.  Go to full article
From left, Jon Rosales and SLU students Ben Ross, Jordan Garfinckle, Lauren Vorhees and Nicole Szucs at the COP15 meeting in Copenhagen.
From left, Jon Rosales and SLU students Ben Ross, Jordan Garfinckle, Lauren Vorhees and Nicole Szucs at the COP15 meeting in Copenhagen.

A veteran observer reports out from the COP15 climate talks in Copenhagen

International attention to last month's climate change meeting in Copenhagen was intense. Tens of thousands of people were there, inside and outside the two-week long COP15 negotiations. There were street protests, traffic jams, lots of congestion and confusion as NGOs and heads of state gathered. A handful of developed nations, including the U.S. and China, reached a last-minute accord that fell short of hopes for a binding agreement on carbon reduction targets.

Reports and analysis since the climate change talks closed have not been enthusiastic. Jon Rosales teaches environmental studies at St. Lawrence University. He was in Copenhagen with four students, who blogged from the conference for NCPR. Rosales is a veteran observer; it was his eighth COP meeting. He spoke with Martha Foley about how the Copenhagen gathering was different, and what that could mean for future climate change negotiations and policy.  Go to full article

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