Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "muskellunge"

Dr. Paul Bowser of Cornell University holds a muskellunge impacted by the VHS virus. Photo: Bowser Lab/Cornell University
Dr. Paul Bowser of Cornell University holds a muskellunge impacted by the VHS virus. Photo: Bowser Lab/Cornell University

Muskies recovering on the St. Lawrence River

Now that it's warming up, more and more people are going fishing. A lot of anglers have their eyes on muskellunge, or muskies. Muskies are popular for their size, and their ability to put up a fight.

"I've never been muskie fishing. But I know a lot of people that do, and I guess hooking into one of these fish is quite an experience! I guess it would be analogous to catching a torpedo," says David MacNeill, a fisheries specialist at New York Sea Grant, which is funding research on muskies.  Go to full article

Muskies threatened by invasive species

This time of year, avid anglers flock to the St. Lawrence River in search of one of the most challenging freshwater catches: the muskellunge, or muskie. Some call it "the fish of 10,000 casts". This year's muskie season is clouded by bad news. A disease called VHS has killed hundreds of the fish. And each year seems to bring new invasive species to the river, causing change and uncertainty in the ecosystem. As researchers try to pin down the effects of these invaders, anglers are calling for action. David Sommerstein has part two in our series on invasive species.  Go to full article

Virus Threatens River Muskies

Biologists are concerned a new fish virus may become an ongoing threat in the St. Lawrence River. DEC officials have confirmed Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia, or VHS, killed hundreds of round gobies, an invasive species, last month near Cape Vincent. The virus also killed 18 muskies, a prized native fish in the St. Lawrence. The DEC says it hasn't affected river trout or salmon populations so far. David Sommerstein spoke with John Farrell. Farrell directs SUNY ESF's Thousand Islands Biological Station near Clayton. He says the virus is common in Europe and Japan, and in saltwater in the Pacific Northwest. It first showed up in the Great Lakes watershed last year, in the Bay of Quinte in Lake Ontario.  Go to full article

1-3 of 3