Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "nadks"

New photo book celebrates Saranac Lake's history

From the earliest settlers, to winter ice palaces, to Adirondack tourism, a new book celebrates the history of Saranac Lake. It was compiled by Neil Surprenant, who teaches American history and is the director of the library at Paul Smith's College.

Surprenant tells Todd Moe that he's lived near Saranac Lake for more than 30 years and really enjoyed exploring its history through hundreds of photos. His new historic photo book of Saranac Lake is part of the popular "Images of America" series.  Go to full article
Roseanne Gallagher, with chickens. Photo: Sarah Harris.
Roseanne Gallagher, with chickens. Photo: Sarah Harris.

Certified naturally grown: an organic alternative

It can be expensive and time-consuming for farmers, especially small farmers, to go through the organic certification process. But there's another option. It's called certified naturally grown. The grassroots organization that offers this label uses organic standards, has farmers conduct inspections for their peers, and provides marketing materials.  Go to full article
The WIC program serves about 10,000 people from Watertown to Malone.
The WIC program serves about 10,000 people from Watertown to Malone.

WIC nutritional program will close alongside children's clinic

There's more fallout from the closing of the North Country Children's Clinic.

The clinic administers a nutrition program for women, infants and children, called WIC. It serves about 10,000 people from Watertown to Malone, giving families healthy food, nutritional advice and food vouchers that can be used at participating grocery stores.

But because of the clinic's financial problems, WIC will close too.  Go to full article
Eric Andrus working on his farm-to-market sailboat. Photo: Sarah Harris
Eric Andrus working on his farm-to-market sailboat. Photo: Sarah Harris

Can North Country farmers feed NYC market?

Demand for local food has skyrocketed in big cities like New York and Boston. But do North Country farmers have a role to play in feeding those cities?  Go to full article
A postcard of Remington's The Howl of the Weather against the Cranberry Lake shoreline.  Photo: Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg
A postcard of Remington's The Howl of the Weather against the Cranberry Lake shoreline. Photo: Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg

In search of Remington's Cranberry Lake haunts

The focus this weekend during Canton's annual Remington Arts Festival, will be on famous native son and 19th century artist Frederic Remington. While he immortalized the western frontier in oil and bronze, Remington also enjoyed visits to the Adirondacks.

Every summer, from 1889 to 1900, he and his wife Eva visited friends on Cranberry Lake. He completed sketches for the first illustrated edition of Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha during visits to the lake, where he also enjoyed hunting, fishing and relaxing. Modern artists and art lovers enjoy re-tracing Remington's footsteps in "the Great South Woods", as it was called.

Since 2000, Allen and Marilyn Splete have been seasonal residents of Cranberry Lake. They love the lake, local history and Remington's art. Earlier this month they invited Todd Moe along for a boat ride to explore a little-known facet of Remington's life.  Go to full article
"We seem to be faced with many ghosts from the past."
- Joseph Selenski, ComLinks board president

Wracked by controversy, ComLinks intends to close

A once powerful social services agency in the North Country is now headed towards closing its doors. ComLinks, based in Malone, says attempts to survive years of theft and mismanagement appear to have failed.

As recently as three weeks ago, Comlinks was talking with local lawmakers and making plans to start over as a grassroots not-for-profit. But board president Joe Selenski says it turns out there's just too much to overcome.  Go to full article
Sue Grimm points out a still-growing poylphemus. Inset: adult polyphemus
Sue Grimm points out a still-growing poylphemus. Inset: adult polyphemus

Heard Up North: Polyphemus moths, monarchs, and more at the VIC

All kinds of creatures make their home in the North Country, including a number of native butterflies. Sarah Harris visited the butterfly house at the Paul Smith's Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) on a rainy Friday afternoon, talked to educator Sue Grimm, and has today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Joe Orefice, mid-butchery. Photo: Kate Glenn
Joe Orefice, mid-butchery. Photo: Kate Glenn

Farmers Under 40: A farmer and a teacher, too

Our Farmers Under 40 series continues throughout the summer. Today we have a profile of Joe Orefice, an assistant professor of forestry at Paul Smith's College.

Orefice taught the school's first sustainable community agriculture course this past year. He also owns and operates a small farm, which he uses as a teaching tool.

This summer Paul Smith's culinary students visited Joe's farm for a lesson in local meats. Sarah Harris joined them and has our story.  Go to full article
Ben Martin sings his heart out at La Casbah.
Ben Martin sings his heart out at La Casbah.

North Country's live music scene thrives through economic blues

This week, North Country Public Radio has been celebrating the region's vibrant music culture. You can listen to the entire series on our website, ncpr.org.

Today we dip into the business of music and take the pulse of the region's live music scene. Despite the two year-old recession, bars, music halls, and university performance spaces are keeping live music onstage. As David Sommerstein reports, the people involved in that business believe live music in the North Country is thriving.  Go to full article

Inmates to be excluded from North Country districts

A measure to change where prison inmates are counted when drawing political districts was slipped into the budget bills passed Tuesday night. Beginning with redistricting based on 2010 census data, inmates will be counted at their home addresses, not at the prison where they're locked up. Supporters called the change a victory for equal representation. But the North Country stands to lose more political clout. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

1-10 of 33  next 10 »  last »