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News stories tagged with "nafta"

Power Plants Top Polluters in North America

North America's environmental watchdog agency created by NAFTA has released its annual report on industrial pollution. It's called Taking Stock. The Commission for Environmental Cooperation looked at chemical releases by companies in 2001, the latest data available. David Sommerstein spoke with William Kennedy, the commission's executive director, about the report. Kennedy says the most important finding is that electric power plants were the worst air polluters in North America in 2001.  Go to full article

Report Says Small Industry Pollution On Rise

A recent study on pollution in North America shows a drop in environmental pollution between 1995 and 2000. The study was conducted by the Commission for Environmental Co-operation, which was set up under the North American Free Trade Agreement. But as the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Dan Karpenchuk reports, one trend being noted is that smaller industries across the continent are becoming the big polluters.  Go to full article

NAFTA & Environment: Mixed Results

In 1994, the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, established an agency to monitor the environmental effects of trade between the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. In a new report, the agency gives NAFTA mixed reviews. David Sommerstein explains.  Go to full article

Cross-border Trade and Tighter Security

Business groups in New York are lobbying in Washington to curb delays at the U.S.-Canadian border, in northern and western parts of the state. The business leaders say the new security precautions since September 11th are hurting trade. Karen Dewitt reports.  Go to full article

IBM Workers in Vermont Could Get Federal Benefits

Laid off workers at Vermont's IBM plant may be eligible for federal benefits under the North American Free Trade Agreement. Jody Tosti reports.  Go to full article

Environmental Effects of Free Trade

When NAFTA was passed in 1994, environmentalists feared catastrophic results. Polluting industries would move to Mexico, where environmental protections hadn't caught up with those in the U.S. and Canada. They were worried that air pollution would increase as more goods were shipped across international borders. And they were concerned that shared resources like the Great Lakes water system might lose their protected status and become commodities subject to trade. Supporters of NAFTA argued that increased prosperity would lead to improved pollution technology and a strengthening of environmental protections. But eight years later, the effects of NAFTA on the environment appear to be mixed. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Schaefer explains why.  Go to full article

FTAA Protesters March Over the International Bridge in Massena

Hundreds of protesters marched peacefully across the international bridge in Massena yesterday afternoon in a show of solidarity against the FTAA or Free Trade Area of the Americas. They're on their way to the summit in Quebec City this weekend.  Go to full article

Brian Mann Speaks with "Street Medics" Protesting Free Trade

In the years since the first free trade protests exploded in Seattle, the movement has grown dramatically. It's also more organized. They have trained legal advisors and media liaisons on the scene. They also have their medical crews. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann met with a team of "street medics" on their way to the Summit of the Americas in Quebec City.  Go to full article

Activists Prepare for FTAA Protests

Political and social activists from across North America are preparing for the unknown as they ready for protests this week at the Summit of the Americas in Quebec City. Groups from St. Lawrence County hope to practice non-violent protest against the FTAA, or Free Trade Area of the Americas, but they're not sure if they'll even make it into Canada. So as a symbolic gesture, many groups plan to stage a demonstration at the Cornwall border crossing near Massena. Jodi Tosti reports.  Go to full article

Free Trade in the Americas: Critics and Supporters, Pt. 2

When leaders of the Americas head to Quebec City next weekend to continue negotiations on the Free Trade Area of the Americas, there'll be a lot more on the table than free trade. The FTAA, as it's called, also establishes the economic, legal, and intellectual rights of companies when they deal with foreign governments. FTAA critics say the rights of people take a back seat to the rights of corporations in free trade deals. In the second installment on protests in Quebec City, David Sommerstein tests the anti-corporate arguments.  Go to full article

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