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News stories tagged with "native-american"

The earliest known portrait of Kateri Tekakwitha. Source: Wikipedia
The earliest known portrait of Kateri Tekakwitha. Source: Wikipedia

NPR examines the "miracle" of Kateri Tekakwitha

Last week, the Vatican declared that a Washington state boy's recovery from a deadly and debilitating illness was a miracle. The Pope signed documents attributing 11-year-old Jake Finkbonner's survival to the intercession of Kateri Tekakwitha. She was a 17th century Mohawk woman who lived in what is now Upstate New York and who converted to Catholicism.

The Pope's decision moves Kateri one step closer to full sainthood. Last week, Bishop Terry LaValley, head of the Diocese of Ogdensburg, issued a statement saying "we eagerly await that day when the church declares that she is numbered among the saints in heaven."

Back in April, NPR's religion corrrespondent, Barbara Bradley-Hagerty, examined the process by which the Vatican decides which miracles are authentic.  Go to full article
Akwesasne Freedom School
Akwesasne Freedom School

Akwesasne Freedom School's mission: Cultural survival

At the Akwesasne Freedom School on the Akwesasne Mohawk reservation near Massena, kids spend their whole day, including recess, completely immersed in the Mohawk language. Nora Flaherty has more.  Go to full article
Camp Gabriels has sat empty for two years (File photo)
Camp Gabriels has sat empty for two years (File photo)

Native American group wants to reinvent Camp Gabriels

Two years after New York State prison officials closed Camp Gabriels, a Mohawk writer and activist wants to reopen the Adirondack facility as an education center and accredited campus with ties to Syracuse University.

Doug George announced last week at a meeting in Ticonderoga that he is working with Native American leaders, state officials and with other educators to develop the program. He hopes to attract students interested in learning about Native culture, language and heritage.

As Brian Mann reports, the proposal has been on the drawing board for more than a year. But key questions remain.  Go to full article
Atsiaktonie's name means "Along the River"
Atsiaktonie's name means "Along the River"

Music to connect hearts and minds

A Mohawk singer-songwriter who won a top award at this year's Native American Music Awards is giving back to his community. Atsiaktonie, who lives in Massena, won a "Nammy" for Best Folk Recording for his cd, Four Wolves Prophecy. He's donating half the proceeds from cd sales to the Akwesasne Freedom School. Atsiaktonie grew up in foster homes and boarding schools around the country. He says his music is spiritual with roots in the Mohawk culture. Todd Moe spoke with him about being the first Mohawk from Akwesasne to win a "Nammy".  Go to full article

Mohawk folk singer Atsiaktonkie wins music award

An Akwesasne Mohawk singer picked up a top award at the annual Native American Music Awards ceremony in Niagara Falls last weekend. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article
Samuel de Champlain was the first European to reach Lake Champlain
Samuel de Champlain was the first European to reach Lake Champlain

Lake Champlain Quad celebrates a forgotten explorer and a neglected landscape

This summer, Lake Champlain will be ringed with events - in New York, Vermont and Quebec. Towns along the shore will be celebrating the four hundredth anniversary of the arrival of French Explorer Samuel de Champlain. Champlain was the first European to reach the lake in 1609. Organizers hope to do more this summer than just throw a big party. Historians, writers and archeologists see the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial as a way to re-introduce what they see as a neglected landscape. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Charlotte King works on a painting in her home studio.
Charlotte King works on a painting in her home studio.

An artist out to promote her culture

Charlotte King is an artist with a mission. She grew up on the Akwesasne Mohawk Reservation near Massena and recently received an art degree from SUNY-Potsdam. Her goal now is to get more Mohawk art into mainstream galleries, and help preserve the region's strong artistic traditions. She's one of more than 300 artists on the reservation, from painters to basket weavers. Her love of art has taken her to the Smithsonian and Sante Fe. But, King draws and paints what she knows, the local environment around the St. Regis and St. Lawrence Rivers and her Native American culture. Some of her work is on display in Massena and Cornwall this month. Todd Moe has this profile.  Go to full article
Katsitsiaroroks Mitchell's "The Gathering."
Katsitsiaroroks Mitchell's "The Gathering."

Mohawk teen?s art on national tour

Artwork by a Mohawk teen is part of a year-long traveling art show. Massena ninth grader Katsitsiaroroks Mitchell won a first place prize in the Native American Student Artist Competition this year. The contest is sponsored by the federal office of Indian Education. The theme this year is "Circle of Empowerment: Education, Language, Culture, Tradition." Her drawing, titled "The Gathering," will be on display at the Smithsonian Institution. St. Lawrence County Arts Council Director Hilary Oak spoke with Katsitsiaroroks Mitchell and her art teacher, Robin LaCourse.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Haws, We Gotch Ye

In their weekly series on North Country place names, Dale Hobson and Gregory Warner discuss a bogus origin for the name "Oswegatchie" as well as the truth... we also hear from Chris Angus, editor of "Oswegatchie: A North Country River".  Go to full article

Thanksgiving Address dispute divides Mohawk tribal council

A dispute over readings of the Iroquois Thanksgiving Address in the local public school has divided the Mohawk Tribal Council. The issue appears headed for federal court despite a compromise offered by the Salmon River school board this week. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

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