Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "nature"

Natural deceptions: crime (and punishment) among animals and plants

Social primates are supposed to share when they find food, but some will cheat. If they are caught, the group will punish them. Some plants and fungi use a kind of barter system to swap nutrients, and some of them will also cheat. But they risk being caught and cut off.

Martha Foley and Curt Stager look at crime and punishment in the natural world.  Go to full article
If you want the feeder to yourself, there's nothing like being able to imitate a hawk. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/57974696@N00/8015491794/">pwhellen</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
If you want the feeder to yourself, there's nothing like being able to imitate a hawk. Photo: pwhellen, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: natural deceptions

Birds and other creatures have a sly side and will use deceptive communications to create an advantage for themselves in finding food and finding mates. Blue jays can imitate the sound of a hawk, scaring other species away from the feeder. Some birds mimic the alarm cries of other species, making them think that another of their kind is warning them about a predator.

But they can't pull the trick too often. "Crying wolf" has the same consequences in the animal world as it does in the fairy tale. Martha Foley and Curt Stager discuss the "tricksy" side of birds, and of cuttlefish.  Go to full article
Male indigo bunting. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/kristi_decourcy/7539738334/">Kristi</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Male indigo bunting. Photo: Kristi, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Well-dressed birds of the North Country

While the North Country is not exactly the tropics, we do have our share of exotically-colored birds. Blue creatures, for example, are rare in nature but we have the bluebird, the blue jay and the indigo bunting.

Then there are the goldfinches and the cardinals, the ruby-throated hummingbird and the oriole. Martha Foley and Curt Stager celebrate a little of the local color in colder climes.  Go to full article
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.

Ready, set, count! BioBlitz starts Sunday morning in Newcomb

Visitors to the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb on Sunday will get a close-up look at wildlife. The annual BioBlitz is a one-day, rapid inventory of animal and plant life. Professional biologists will join citizen scientists to study and catalog wildlife in the Adirondacks, including salamanders, bees, mushrooms and wildflowers.

Todd Moe spoke with Ezra Schwartzberg about the expert-led species inventory teams that will discover, count, map, and learn about the park's biodiversity along lakeshores, marshes and forests.  Go to full article
This is how small a deer tick is. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tick_male_size_comparison_%28aka%29.jpg">Andre Karwath</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
This is how small a deer tick is. Photo: Andre Karwath, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Deer ticks: How they get on you, how to get them off

Spring and early summer is the prime time of year for encounters with deer ticks, carriers of the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. While still uncommon in the Adirondack upcountry, deer ticks are plentiful in the North Country lowlands.

They're hard to see, and hard to remove safely. But not impossible. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about the life cycle of the deer tick, and practical ways to minimize exposure to Lyme disease.  Go to full article
Wood Frog. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikemcd/3623351755">Michael McDonough</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wood Frog. Photo: Michael McDonough, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

State Senate claims wood frog for New York

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The wood frog is one more hop closer to becoming New York's official amphibian.

The state Senate voted 50-4 on Tuesday to add it to the list alongside other official animals such as the blue bird, beaver, brook trout and snapping turtle.  Go to full article

The return of the black fly

This pest of the northern spring can travel up to twenty miles on the wind. How to get away? Dress in yellow, some suggest, or tie a dragonfly to your hat. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager consult.  Go to full article
Wild morels, a spring treasure.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Wild morels, a spring treasure. Photo: Todd Moe

The cure for morel fever -- stalking the elusive spring mushroom

This is the season when morels are hunted by thousands of people simply for their taste and the joy of the hunt. They're another sign of spring in the North Country. Mushroom hunters say their favorite fungi are popping up earlier than usual this year.

Todd Moe has caught morel fever every spring since he was a child, and headed into his own back woods a couple of years ago to look for these "aristocrats" of the forest.

A reminder about looking for edible mushrooms: even distinctive yellow morels have look-a-likes that are poisonous. The slightest doubt about a mushroom is warning enough not to eat it.  Go to full article
Black bear. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/8749778@N06/12033862626/">Eric Kilby</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Black bear. Photo: Eric Kilby, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

DEC adopts10-year black bear management plan

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The Department of Environmental Conservation is adopting a 10-year plan to monitor and manage black bear populations in the state.

Several revisions were made to the plan after public comments were reviewed. One change clarified that the agency plans to assess the pros and cons of using dogs, bait or cable restraints for taking bears, although none of the measures are currently proposed for use.  Go to full article
A bat in Vermont's Aeolus Cave frozen in icicle, Photo: Brian Mann
A bat in Vermont's Aeolus Cave frozen in icicle, Photo: Brian Mann

Biologists check Vermont cave for bat disease rate

DORSET, Vt. (AP) Biologists are analyzing data collected over the winter in a Vermont cave to determine whether more bats are surviving white nose syndrome.

Last fall, biologists glued radio tags to the backs of more than 400 bats outside the Aeolus cave in Dorset and lined the cave with electronic equipment that monitors how many of the bats emerged in the winter.  Go to full article

1-10 of 269  next 10 »  last »