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News stories tagged with "nature-conservancy"

OK Slip Falls, considered one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
OK Slip Falls, considered one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

Historic Finch Adirondack vote expected this morning

Park Agency commissioners are expected to vote later today on creation of a vast new wilderness area in the central Adirondacks. The APA is in the final steps of deciding the fate of the former Finch timber lands.  Go to full article
The confluence of the Hudson River, at right, and the Cedar River, bottom, is on the 18,300-acre Essex Chain of Lakes tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy of the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy
The confluence of the Hudson River, at right, and the Cedar River, bottom, is on the 18,300-acre Essex Chain of Lakes tract in the towns of Minerva and Newcomb. Photo: Carl Heilman II, courtesy of the Adirondack Chapter of The Nature Conservancy

Historic Finch lands decision near in Adirondacks

The Adirondack Park Agency has begun final deliberations into the future of the Finch Pruyn timberlands.

Roughly 40.000 acres in the central Adirondacks are slated to be classified tomorrow, with state officials pushing for creation of a big new wilderness area along the upper Hudson River. Also in the works is a new motor-free paddling area on the Essex Chain of Lakes.

At the start of yesterday's session, APA executive director Terry Martino called the conservation effort "historic." She praised the Adirondack Nature Conservancy, which engineered the massive deal, first unveiled in 2007.

Some aspects of the Finch classification plan remain controversial, including a plan to build a snowmobile bridge over the wild Cedar River. But the big story this week may be how amicable this process has been, with far less drama and bitterness than in previous years.  Go to full article
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner.  Photo: Adirondack Park Agency
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner. Photo: Adirondack Park Agency

Finch lands top APA agenda

The Adirondack Park Agency gathers today in Ray Brook for a two-day meeting that will focus on the new Finch Pruyn lands.

Commissioners will consider alternate plans for managing the vast new public lands purchased as part of a deal engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  Go to full article
Brian Mann interviews Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  His group is devoting $500,000 to helping spark new economic projects in the Park near the former Finch Pruyn timberlands (NCPR file photo)
Brian Mann interviews Mike Carr, head of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy. His group is devoting $500,000 to helping spark new economic projects in the Park near the former Finch Pruyn timberlands (NCPR file photo)

Adirondack Nature Conservancy offers $500,000 to boost jobs

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy says it will provide $500,000 in grant funds to help businesses and communities developing new projects around the former Finch Pruyn timberlands.

Tens of thousands of acres of land in Indian Lake, Minerva, and Newcomb are being added to the state forest preserve. Governor Andrew Cuomo has argued that the new lands will help boost the Park's tourism economy.

The Conservancy's Mike Carr says this grant fund is designed to help make that happen.  Go to full article
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann

Public comment period ending for new Adk Park lands

This is the final week for the public to offer input and opinions about how to manage tens of thousands of acres of new public lands in the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Park Agency held hearings across the state to gather feedback on seven different proposals for how lands in Indian Lake and Minerva should be classified.

The hearings have wrapped up, but people still have until the end of the day on Friday to send written comments.  Go to full article
Forest lands harvested for more than a century will soon be "forever wild."  Photo: Brian Mann
Forest lands harvested for more than a century will soon be "forever wild." Photo: Brian Mann

Do big Adirondack conservation deals hurt loggers?

Governor Andrew Cuomo says the big Finch conservation deal in the Adirondacks will open new lands to snowmobilers, hikers, hunters, and anglers. State officials and green groups say that could mean a major boost for the North Country's tourism industry.

But critics say the $50 million deal will hurt the timber industry, making it harder for struggling loggers and mill operators. Some industry leaders say they worry about the loss of productive timberlands that have been harvested for more than a century.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County, one of the mountain lakes that will be opened to public access. Photo: Brian Mann
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County, one of the mountain lakes that will be opened to public access. Photo: Brian Mann

Governor promotes historic land deal in Adirondacks

Governor Andrew Cuomo traveled to the Adirondacks Sunday, bringing with him most of his executive cabinet and dozens of downstate reporters.

He made the trip to promote a big new $50 million land purchase that will add tens of thousands of acres to the Park's forest preserve.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)

NY to shape public use of new Adirondack park land

State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year.

Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year. Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. Supporters say these lands will open popular new areas for hiking, paddling, hunting and fishing.

The process is now underway to determine the kind of rules and guidelines that will shape public access, and state officials say they hope to avoid the kind of clashes that have marked past land classification efforts.  Go to full article
Mays Pond, an inholding in the Pigeon Lake Wilderness, will likely sell to a private landowner (Photo: LandVest)
Mays Pond, an inholding in the Pigeon Lake Wilderness, will likely sell to a private landowner (Photo: LandVest)

Small Adirondack land deals may slip through NY's fingers

This week, the Cuomo administration paid out roughly $1.5 million to land trusts across the state. The money will mostly go to help with administration costs and to fund internships.

In the Adirondacks, much of the land conservation debate over the last few years has focused on historic large-scale deals orchestrated by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.

The Finch Pruyn and F ollensby projects could lead to the expansion of the Park's forest preserve by tens of thousands of acres.

But while those projects draw the spotlight, and the controversy, green groups say they're worried that smaller but important parcels of land are going unprotected. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo:  Dan Snyder)
The Nature Conservancy acknowledges that silt from this site reached a trout stream (Photo: Dan Snyder)

Nature Conservancy loggers accused of damaging Adirondack trout stream

The Adirondack Nature Conservancy has emerged in recent years as one of the largest owners of timberland in the North Country.

The green group uses certified logging methods designed to protect rivers and other sensitive ecosystems.

But a landowner in Essex County is accusing the Conservancy's tree-cutters of damaging a certified trout stream.

As Brian Mann reports, state officials have opened an investigation.  Go to full article

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