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News stories tagged with "nature"

New "Deer Crossing" technology

Every year there are about 1.5 million deer-car accidents. Now highway officials are testing a new system to cut down on those accidents. Rebecca Williams has more.  Go to full article

Looking up: the winter sky emerges

We take advantage of the beautiful fall weather this week--the night-time weather that is. Astronomer Jeff Miller, Martha Foley and Brian Mann talk about the full moon and the planets.  Go to full article
(photo: Nina Schoch)
(photo: Nina Schoch)

Loon populations increasing in Adirondacks

The call of the loon in the Adirondacks might be heard more these days. Data collected by the Adirondack Loon Conservation Program show loon populations have increased and stabilized over the last eight years. Todd Moe talks with loon biologist Nina Schoch, who says loons are regularly spotted on 75% of the lakes in the region where the birds have been counted since 2001. She attributes part of their rebound to a recovery from the impacts of the pesticide DDT.  Go to full article
Dragonflier Nick Donnelly searches a Franklin County pond
Dragonflier Nick Donnelly searches a Franklin County pond

Dragonfly devotees swarm for the hunt

Take a paddle or hike along a stream, or spend some time gardening and you'll likely hear the familiar click of wings or glimpse a flying glint of blue or green. Dragonflies are a familiar and favorite sight in the North Country. And now, during the summer months, excitement is high among "dragonfliers" whose calendars are extra full because this is the time of year when dragonflies are most commonly seen. But researchers say there are more questions than answers about dragonflies. This is the fourth summer that the DEC and Nature Conservancy have seriously studied dragonflies and their close relatives, damselflies, in some of the more remote parts of the state. With the help of volunteers, biologists are out to foster public interest in the conservation of the colorful, winged insects and their aquatic habitats. Todd Moe found that, for a hobby that includes searching for large bugs in swampy areas, it has a lot of followers.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Salamanders and Newts

What's the difference between a salamander and a newt? Not too much, says Dr. Curt Stager. He talks with Martha Foley about how aquatic salamanders mature into the forest variety.  Go to full article
Halpern divides her time between Vermont and the Adirondacks
Halpern divides her time between Vermont and the Adirondacks

Author Sue Halpern: What we remember, why we forget

North Country writer Sue Halpern has spent decades exploring some of the most complicated tangles of science and human experience. She's written about the migrations of monarch butterflies, and the intimate experience of solitude. Her new book, Can't Remember What I Forgot, goes to the frontier of modern brain science. She decodes the way the brain stories memory and looks at new treatment for diseases like Alzheimer's. Halpern spoke this week with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

Online map of wildlife diseases available

There's a new online map for tracking wildlife diseases that threaten animals and people. Chuck Quirmbach reports.  Go to full article
Aimee Hurt has trained dogs for conservation work for nine years
Aimee Hurt has trained dogs for conservation work for nine years

A dog's job: studying moose in the Adirondacks

Wildlife biologists say that New York state is home to more than 500 moose. Their population has surged in recent years. Researchers would like to know a lot more about the animals: what they're eating, where they're going, and why their numbers are growing so rapidly. A new project organized by the Wildlife Conservation Society aims to gather some of that data using trained tracking dogs. Brian Mann spent a day with a research team in the northern Adirondacks and has our story.  Go to full article
Native plant expert Jane Desotelle inspects a plot of mullen, or "Quaker's Rouge", on Falls Island in Canton.
Native plant expert Jane Desotelle inspects a plot of mullen, or "Quaker's Rouge", on Falls Island in Canton.

Eating the North Country: wild food foraging

For nearly 30 years, Jane Desotelle has been collecting herbs in the Adirondacks for teas and sometimes an entire meal of found food. Desotelle owns "Underwood Herbs" and also runs a botanical sanctuary. She's a gardener, artist and plant expert. She recently led a plant walk for TAUNY on Falls Island in downtown Canton. Todd Moe tagged along to learn more about weeds that are good for you. Reminder: It's often illegal to pick wild plants on public lands, and always ask permission before venturing onto someone else's property.  Go to full article
Robin Rhodes-Crowell digs up leeks in her woods near Canton
Robin Rhodes-Crowell digs up leeks in her woods near Canton

Stalking a celebrated spring staple

This year, NCPR is celebrating its 40th anniversary and food in the North Country. As part of "Local Flavor", our occasional series on growing, cooking and eating locally, Todd Moe heads into the woods near Canton in search of wild leeks. It's planting season in many backyards, but not all local food is cultivated. Sometimes it's nice to reap delicacies from nature's garden.  Go to full article

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