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News stories tagged with "nature"

Chipmunk with attitude. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wainwright/234922450/">Chrissy Wainwright</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Chipmunk with attitude. Photo: Chrissy Wainwright, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Bold Chipmunks

Chipmunks aren't exactly shy--their metabolism runs too high to turn down a free lunch--but neither are they social among themselves, once beyond the nest. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about this aggressively territorial backyard fixture.  Go to full article
Snowy Owl.  Photo:  Larry Master
Snowy Owl. Photo: Larry Master

Snowy owls invade NY, other states in historic numbers

Snowy Owls from the arctic tundra are setting up winter residence at airports, fields and beaches far south of their normal range. Bird-watchers are reporting snowy owl sightings in dozens of locations across northern New York, the Northeast, midwest and even as far south as North Carolina.

The large, snow-white owls with luminous yellow eyes are thrilling bird-watchers. Todd Moe spoke with Lake Placid birder Larry Master.  Go to full article

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<em>Elysia chlorotica</em> is a photosynthetic slug that uses chloroplasts from the algae it eats to make energy from sunlight. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Elysia_chlorotica_%281%29.jpg">Patrick Krug</a>, Cataloging Diversity in the Sacoglossa LifeDesk
Elysia chlorotica is a photosynthetic slug that uses chloroplasts from the algae it eats to make energy from sunlight. Photo: Patrick Krug, Cataloging Diversity in the Sacoglossa LifeDesk

Natural Selections: "Alternative" animals

In general, plants make food from sunlight, and animals fuel themselves by "burning" oxygen. But some animals think outside the box.

Curt stager and Martha Foley look at a photosynthetic slug that hijacks the genetic machinery of the algae in its diet, and at a jellyfish that needs no oxygen, burning the alternative fuels of hydrogen and sulphur.  Go to full article
A pigeon's eye view from the Empire State Building. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/yuan2003/1187720684/">Richard Yuan</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A pigeon's eye view from the Empire State Building. Photo: Richard Yuan, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: more on pigeons

The ubiquitous bird of cities and towns was designed for a different environment. The pigeon's distinctive style of flight is adapted for maneuverability in tight places--near vertical takeoffs and quick changes of direction. This adaptation to cliff and mountainside environments serves them well among our urban cliff dwellings. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss.  Go to full article
Spotted hyena in Kenya. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/vidyo/6136697677/">Ray Morris</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Spotted hyena in Kenya. Photo: Ray Morris, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Hyenas

Martha Foley wonders, "Is there a more maligned and mischaracterized animal than the Hyena?" Dr. Curt Stager, a hyena fan, gives the real lowdown on this social animal.  Go to full article

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Adirondack biologist Nina Schoch bands a Saw-Whet Owl near Lake Placid during fall migration.  Photo:  Costa Boutsikaris.
Adirondack biologist Nina Schoch bands a Saw-Whet Owl near Lake Placid during fall migration. Photo: Costa Boutsikaris.

Fall migration's special rewards

The fall migration is underway, a great time for birders to be outdoors watching the skies and treetops. Todd Moe spoke with Lake Placid bird watcher Larry Master about what he's seeing on his farm: lots of sparrows and finches. It's also a great season for up-close-and-personal views of birds -- Master is hosting a crew of birders busy banding Saw-Whet owls this week.  Go to full article
Artist Marion Bradish in her studio along the St. Regis.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Artist Marion Bradish in her studio along the St. Regis. Photo: Todd Moe

Marion Bradish: a creative urge, a second career

As part of an on-going series, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, it's a trip to an artist's home in a small community between Potsdam and Malone. Marion Bradish has set up her home studio, "buried in the back woods," as she calls it, in the hamlet of Buckton, along the St. Regis River. A year ago, Bradish took a mid-life career leap from an office job to creating her own artist studio where she paints and teaches.  Go to full article
Lionesses love the mane. . . Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitalart/3240381175/">Art G</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Lionesses love the mane. . . Photo: Art G, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Lion Manes

Why would a heavy fur cape, like a lion's mane, be appropriate on a tropical savanna?

As with male fashion in humans, it appears the that the lionesses of the Serengeti like it--the thicker and darker, the better. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk hair.  Go to full article

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