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News stories tagged with "nature"

New magazine connects kids and nature

The state Department of Conservation is launching a new nature magazine for kids, filled with photos, articles and tips on activities designed to encourage children to reconnect with the outdoors and the natural world. DEC Commissioner Pete Grannis says Conservationist for Kids will be published three times a year. He told Todd Moe that the new magazine is part of a plan to connect more New Yorkers to nature.  Go to full article
A male Common Redpoll (photo: Larry Master, Lake Placid)<br /><br />
A male Common Redpoll (photo: Larry Master, Lake Placid)

Counting birds in the winter

The 108th annual Christmas Bird Count is underway across North America. Todd Moe talks with Adirondack birder and naturalist Larry Master. He's been participating in the annual Saranac Lake area census for 35 years. Master says the Bird Count began in 1900 as a protest against an annual holiday bird hunt.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Bird Feathers

What can we learn from a single feather about a bird or about the purpose of that feather? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about these unique and remarkable natural structures.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Seeing Evolution

Evolution as a theory has more going for it than sheer speculation. Darwin's ideas about how new species arise are supported, for example, by the recent development of a distinct species of marsh grass. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager look at the scientific evidence supporting evolution.  Go to full article

Watertown tries to shoo crows out of the city

Crows are garrulous, clubby birds. Good fliers, fun to watch. But they have their place. Flocks (proper name "murders") can provide human-like entertainment in the countryside. But in cities...not so much. Some cities like Watertown bring in professionals to get rid of crows, particularly at this time of year. Mary Corriveau is city manager of Watertown. She tells Jonathan Brown the birds are starting to flock downtown where asphalt and heated buildings help keep them warm through the winter.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Tree Shapes

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager explain how tree shapes, like our own physical shapes, are determined by both genetics and environment.  Go to full article

The whys of fall colors

Red is this fall's color, at least in the North Country's woods. How leaves change color is pretty well understood; just why they do so remains something of a mystery. And why red, especially? Good question... for our commentator, Paul Hetzler.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Curiosity

It may be what killed the cat, but Dr. Curt Stager maintains that curiosity (or noseyness, as Martha Foley puts it) has survival value in humans and other species.  Go to full article

New York moose population growing "exponentially"

State wildlife officials say New York's moose population is growing exponentially. Based on field work and sightings reported by the public, the Department of Environmental Conservation estimates as many as 500 moose could be living in the state, mostly in the Adirondacks. It's a dramatic increase from a decade ago, when the DEC put their number between 50 and 100. Only a handful of moose were in New York in the 1980s. It's now breeding season for moose and that means the animals are roaming far and wide looking for mates. This week, a bull moose broke through a fence at the Great Escape amusement park in Queensbury and trotted through the parking lot of Aviation Mall before DEC officers arrived to move the animal away from the area. DEC wildlife biologist Ken Kogut tells Jonathan Brown that as the number of moose increase so do the amount of car accidents they cause.  Go to full article
Former Gov. Pataki in the mail hall. Photo: The Wild Center
Former Gov. Pataki in the mail hall. Photo: The Wild Center

Wild Center's main hall renamed for Pataki

Former Governor George Pataki was in Tupper Lake Monday to tour the Wild Center. It was his first visit to the facility which he helped to build by earmarking more than $14 million in taxpayer funds for the project. Museum officials showed their gratitude, announcing that the main exhibition hall will be renamed in Pataki's honor. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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