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News stories tagged with "nature"

Proposed trout pool (Source: Adk Aquarium)
Proposed trout pool (Source: Adk Aquarium)

Aquarium proposed for southern Adirondacks

A group of volunteers based in Queensbury say they hope to build a new aquarium in the southern Adirondacks. The project comes two years after a similar proposal on the St. Lawrence River failed to meet its fundraising goals. Brian Mann spoke with organizer Danelle Dessaint, who says an aquarium would be a natural fit for the Adirondack Park.  Go to full article

Species avoids being prey

This week, we heard Brian Mann's story from the goose roundup in Saranac Lake. Scientists are studyng the geese to see why more and more of them don't make the storied migration north to nest. One reason may be that shorefront lawns and parks create habitat that's just too good to pass by. Creatures change their patterns for lots of reason. A new study in the journal Ecology finds those changes don't always work out to the animal's advantage. Rebecca Williams reports.  Go to full article
Mohawk elder Ray Fadden telling a story. Inset: poet Maurice Kenny
Mohawk elder Ray Fadden telling a story. Inset: poet Maurice Kenny

Giving Voice: Maurice Kenny on Ray Fadden

Poets are often asked "Where do you find your inspiration?" Sometimes the answer is a person--a mentor or teacher whose words and example are life-changing. We hear poet Maurice Kenny talk about the century-old Mohawk elder, teacher, storyteller, activist and naturalist Ray Fadden, and hear a few of the poems he inspired.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: An eerie mystery sound

This Heard Up North is a mystery - and an eerie one at that. A listener recorded a sound she heard recently in the middle of the night. We're hoping you can help identify what it is. If you think you know, please send an e-mail to jonathan@ncpr.org.  Go to full article

Call-in on regional climate change

Local weather and natural observations recorded for the region over many years give support for the claim that the North Country mirrors the rest of the world in experiencing a warming climate. What might that mean for the environment, the economy, and our way of life? Martha Foley, paleoclimatologist Curt Stager and physicist Aileen O'Donoghue discuss the possibilities and take calls from listeners.  Go to full article

Preview: Rachel Carson in the Adirondacks

Students, artists, writers and environmentalists in the Adirondacks will celebrate the 100th birthday of Rachel Carson with a series of events this month. Carson was a naturalist, biologist and writer whose 1962 book, Silent Spring, touched off a national environmental awareness. Todd Moe talks with Paul Hai, co-coordinator of the Rachel Carson in the Adirondacks Centennial Celebration, about the project's cross-disciplinary approach to celebrating her legacy.  Go to full article

Mysterious disappearing bees

Millions of honeybees across the country are dying mysteriously. Entire hives or colonies of bees are collapsing. Scientists say it's some new threat. They're scrambling to find answers. As Bob Allen reports, bees are crucial in pollinating billions of dollars worth of crops every spring.  Go to full article

Books review: Two books with a passion for nature

It's almost time to get out hiking, but while we wait for the snow to melt and the mud to dry up, we still have time to learn more about our northern woods. Betsy Kepes reviews two new books by knowledgeable Adirondack naturalists: Why the Adirondacks Look the Way They Do, by Mike Storey, and The Great South Woods II, by Peter O'Shea.  Go to full article
<i>Homo floresiensis</i>, left, and <i>Homo Sapiens</i>
Homo floresiensis, left, and Homo Sapiens

Natural Selections: Old "Hobbits"

Dr. Curt Stager and Marth Foley talk about a new hominid species, Homo floresiensis, whose 18,000-year-old remains have been unearthed on an Indonesian island. The diminutive stature of this close relative of modern humans has earned it the nickname "hobbit."  Go to full article
Searching by canoe.
Searching by canoe.

Searching for the ivory-billed woodpecker

Leah Filo is a biologist with the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. She's spent most of her professional life doing field work with migratory songbirds. In January, she joined the search for a ghost among birds, the ivory-billed woodpecker - and she came back a believer. The ivory-billed was long thought to be extinct - but in April 2005, a partnership led by Cornell University's ornithology lab formally announced the rediscovery of the ivory-billed in an area of Arkansas bottom land swamp known as the Big Woods. They cited "visual encounters", a video clip, and sounds linked to ivory-bills. Not everyone believes. Since then, scientists and volunteers have been scouring likely habitat for more sightings. Leah Filo volunteered to help and found herself spending two weeks in the very Big Woods of the 2005 sightings -- along the White River in Arkansas. It was wet and chilly -- nights in the 30s, days in the 40s. It's bottom land forest, mostly deciduous woods that flood frequently. Leah spent most of her time in waders. She kept lots of notes, and kept an audio journal as well. She spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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