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News stories tagged with "nature"

Artist Marion Bradish in her studio along the St. Regis.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Artist Marion Bradish in her studio along the St. Regis. Photo: Todd Moe

Marion Bradish: a creative urge, a second career

As part of an on-going series, we'll bring you some of the voices of the many folks in the North Country who make a living in their own workshops, basements and spare rooms. It might sound charming - setting your own work hours - but the artisans we've talked to say full-time art is not an easy decision and a lot of hard work. Finding space, commissions, marketing, moral support, and reserving uninterrupted creative time are some of the challenges.

Today, it's a trip to an artist's home in a small community between Potsdam and Malone. Marion Bradish has set up her home studio, "buried in the back woods," as she calls it, in the hamlet of Buckton, along the St. Regis River. A year ago, Bradish took a mid-life career leap from an office job to creating her own artist studio where she paints and teaches.  Go to full article
Lionesses love the mane. . . Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitalart/3240381175/">Art G</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Lionesses love the mane. . . Photo: Art G, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Lion Manes

Why would a heavy fur cape, like a lion's mane, be appropriate on a tropical savanna?

As with male fashion in humans, it appears the that the lionesses of the Serengeti like it--the thicker and darker, the better. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk hair.  Go to full article
Gecko walking on the wall of a glass enclosure. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/keithmarshall/3934863305/">Keith Marshall</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved. Inset: microstructure of Gecko toe, by <a href="">Douglasy</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
Gecko walking on the wall of a glass enclosure. Photo: Keith Marshall, Creative Commons, some rights reserved. Inset: microstructure of Gecko toe, by Douglasy, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.

Natural Selections: Gecko feet

Geckos have a remarkable ability to run up vertical surfaces, and even across ceilings. But their feet do not form suction cups, nor are they sticky with any kind of secreted glue. Dr. Curt Stager tells Martha Foley the secret of the lizard's gravity-defying feet, which has as much to with atomic physics as biology.  Go to full article
Algonquin Park Wolves. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdbsound/3968088234/">JDB Photos</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Algonquin Park Wolves. Photo: JDB Photos, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Howling for wolves

The Eastern Timber Wolf lived across the eastern United States before humans virtually erased it from the landscape. But in some parts of Canada, the Eastern Wolf is alive and well. And every August for the past fifty years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear its howl. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.  Go to full article
Nighttime in Algonquin Park. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/64894594@N08/7046599793">abuakel</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Nighttime in Algonquin Park. Photo: abuakel, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Listen: Wolf howl sound check

You just heard a public wolf howl at Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario. But that event can only take place if park naturalists actually hear wolves the night before, during what they call a "sound check."

So on Wednesday night last week, teams of naturalists spread through the park, scouting the area and keeping in touch by handheld radio. It was past ten in the evening. The night was clear and still, and the sky dripped with meteors. That's today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Kid's around a life-size model of a whale heart at the Carnegie Museum. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nosuchuser/4152475705">feral godmother</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Kid's around a life-size model of a whale heart at the Carnegie Museum. Photo: feral godmother, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Animal hearts

From worms to whales, most creatures have hearts. In a worm it's a simple tube, in a whale it can pump 60 gallons of blood per minute.

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the variety of hearts in the animal kingdom.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrishunkeler/7760119788/">Chris Hunkeler</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Chris Hunkeler, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Laughter

What is laughter? Is it exclusive to humans? Is it different for women and men? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss "the best medicine."  Go to full article
Hearth Moon Rising is an ordained priestess in the Dianic tradition and in the Fellowship of Isis.  She lives in Keene Valley.  Photo: Hearth Moon Rising
Hearth Moon Rising is an ordained priestess in the Dianic tradition and in the Fellowship of Isis. She lives in Keene Valley. Photo: Hearth Moon Rising

Books: Invoking Animal Magic

Hearth Moon Rising is an Adirondack psychotherapist who is passionate about nature, the environment, animals and her own pagan spirituality. For more than 20 years she has taught magic and helped others integrate their experience of the natural world into their spiritual practice.

She's the author of a new book, Invoking Animal Magic, and has spent this summer talking about the mythology and folklore of animals and healing to audiences in Keene Valley and Saranac Lake. Hearth is also a licensed New York State Outdoor Guide, and enjoys hiking, running, snowshoeing, skiing and mountain biking.

Hearth Moon Rising spoke with Todd Moe about the book and her spiritual connection to the natural world.  Go to full article
A degassing jet now helps keep Lake Nyos in Cameroon from exploding again. Photo: <a href="http://mhalb.pagesperso-orange.fr/nyos/">Degassing Nyos</a>
A degassing jet now helps keep Lake Nyos in Cameroon from exploding again. Photo: Degassing Nyos

Natural Selections: Exploding lake

When local legend in Africa spoke of an exploding lake, western researchers scoffed. They were wrong--Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about the exploding lake, Lake Nyos.  Go to full article
Clarkson University undergraduate students, with Professor Tom Langen (third from left), look for golden winged warblers at Fish Creek State Wildlife Management Area in New York, on July 24, 2013. Photo: Julie Grant.
Clarkson University undergraduate students, with Professor Tom Langen (third from left), look for golden winged warblers at Fish Creek State Wildlife Management Area in New York, on July 24, 2013. Photo: Julie Grant.

Ecology moves from the field to the screen

People who dream about being ecologists - and studying the environment for a living - might want to get comfortable sitting at a computer. More and more data are being collected and analyzed online, and that's changing what it means to be an ecologist.  Go to full article

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