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News stories tagged with "ncheroin"

Naloxone syringe. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Naloxone_%281%29.JPG">Intropin</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Naloxone syringe. Photo: Intropin, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Senate leadership proposes bills to combat heroin epidemic

A Republican-led Senate task force has released a package of bills aimed at combatting the growing heroin addiction in New York.

The bills would require schools to carry supplies of Naloxone, the drug used to treat heroin overdoses and in many cases, prevent death. They would also require better management of patients treated for drug addiction, and convert some recently closed state prisons to treatment centers.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Heroin_aufkochen.JPG">Hendrike</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Hendrike, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

"First ever" statewide heroin database in the works

Another development in the epidemic of North Country heroin abuse: On Wednesday, police caught a man with 60 grams of heroin, driving near Gouverneur. As the Watertown Daily Times reports, Elvis Pigott of Massena allegedly had about $20,000-worth of the drug.

Police arrested Pigott in the town of Fowler. According to the Times, the bust was part of an undercover operation into heroin trafficking by the St. Lawrence County Drug Task Force.

Pigott's charged with third-degree criminal possession with intent to sell, among other charges. The arrest involved multiple, local police departments, working together with the help of federal agents.  Go to full article
Naloxone (also known as Narcan). Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/punchingjudy/1934879517/in/photolist-3WYLgF-7Z11kZ">PunchingJudy</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Naloxone (also known as Narcan). Photo: PunchingJudy, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Heroin overdose-fighting drug comes to the North Country

Last month, almost 300 police officers from across the state gathered in Albany, to learn how to use what some health officials call the "magic weapon" in the fight against heroin. It's called Naloxone or Narcan, and if administered early enough, it can save the life of someone overdosing.

Officers came away from the two-day training not only knowing how to administer the medication, but also with prescriptions and kits of it to keep in their vehicles, all free of charge. And April's training was just the first: the plan is to bring the trainings around New York--including up to the North Country, where, for example, Malone Village police will train to use Naloxone next Wednesday.  Go to full article
District Attorney Derek Champagne from Franklin County says counties need to begin tracking and reporting heroin overdoses and deaths more accurately. He also wants better regional crime intelligence. NCPR File photo: Brian Mann
District Attorney Derek Champagne from Franklin County says counties need to begin tracking and reporting heroin overdoses and deaths more accurately. He also wants better regional crime intelligence. NCPR File photo: Brian Mann

Franklin County DA wants North Country crime intelligence center

One of the North Country's prosecutors says the region needs better intelligence-gathering to deal with the spread of crime, including a surge in heroin trafficking. Franklin County District Attorney Derek Champagne says he hopes to see crime analysts based in Malone who would help share information throughout the North Country.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/garysoup/367513235/">Gary Stevens</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Gary Stevens, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Massena responds to dirty needle discoveries

Massena's chief of police, Tim Currier, says he is looking into programs that would encourage safe disposal of used syringes. The syringes are a biohazard; sometimes they transmit diseases like Hepatitis C or HIV.

Last month, Massena police officers responded to 11 calls from people who found used syringes in public: in a park, near a school, and on Main Street.  Go to full article

Nine heroin overdoses in one day escalate calls for change

This week NCPR is looking in-depth at the crisis of heroin use in rural New York and Vermont (hear those stories here.) Some officials say there needs to be a better way to track heroin overdoses and deaths. On Tuesday, nine people in Burlington overdosed in a single day, prompting calls for better coordination between police and healthcare experts.  Go to full article
Cooking heroin. Experts say the drug is cheap and easy to find in the North Country. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Heroin.JPG">Psychonaught</a>, public domain
Cooking heroin. Experts say the drug is cheap and easy to find in the North Country. Photo: Psychonaught, public domain

Hooked on heroin, searching for treatment

This week, North Country Public Radio has been looking at the rapid spread of heroin in rural New York (find those stories here). It's easy to find and cheap to buy and experts say it's ruining people's lives at an unprecedented rate.

But this isn't the first time heroin has surged in the North Country's small towns. A decade ago, rural heroin spiked in small towns and college campuses across the region. Today, we're returning to Brian Mann's story from 2004 about two recovering heroin addicts struggling to find methadone treatment, driving long-distance to Syracuse.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomma/4906491235/">Thomas Marthinsen</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Thomas Marthinsen, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

How Vermont is attacking heroin abuse with public health

This week, NCPR is looking at how New York is beginning to grapple with the heroin epidemic in rural areas like the North Country (more stories). We thought it would be helpful to see what a state that's ahead of New York is doing.

At the beginning of this year, Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin broke with tradition in a very unusual way. Instead of previewing a broad agenda for the year in his State of the State address, he dedicated the 35-minute speech to one issue: heroin and opiate addiction.  Go to full article
District Attorney Derek Champagne from Franklin County says treatment, not more arrests, is the best strategy for the heroin crisis.  Photo: Brian Mann
District Attorney Derek Champagne from Franklin County says treatment, not more arrests, is the best strategy for the heroin crisis. Photo: Brian Mann

Heroin fight shifts from "war" to public health

This week, we're looking in-depth at the heroin epidemic that's hitting small towns in rural New York and Vermont (find more stories).

In many ways, the spread of cheap heroin in rural America mirrors the urban drug crisis of the 1970s that sparked America's national war on drugs.

But these days, even many police and prosecutors say they want a new approach, one that will send more addicts for treatment and recovery, with fewer men and women going to prison for lengthy sentences.  Go to full article
Shawn McKeen from Plattsburgh saw his life derailed, first by prescription drugs, then by street heroin.  Photo:  Brian Mann
Shawn McKeen from Plattsburgh saw his life derailed, first by prescription drugs, then by street heroin. Photo: Brian Mann

North Country heroin stuns small towns, wrecks lives

Over the last few years, Vermont has grappled with a growing heroin epidemic. The drug's painful reach into small towns has drawn national headlines. Now there's growing awareness that heroin has also arrived in the North Country. The drug is cheaper and easier to find.

At a public hearing held by a new state Senate task force, formed in March, addicts, treatment experts, police and prosecutors talked about a wave of heroin.  Go to full article

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