Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "ncsymposium13"

10-year old Aryn Rivers, a fifth-grader at Canton Central, is lobbying for state aid for her school.  Photo: Julie Grant
10-year old Aryn Rivers, a fifth-grader at Canton Central, is lobbying for state aid for her school. Photo: Julie Grant

North Country schools fight for fiscal survival

It may sound like you've heard this one before: North Country parents, students, and school officials are lobbying lawmakers in Albany for more state aid. There was a big push in districts like Canton and Potsdam last spring for more state money. But it didn't help much.

Now the stakes are even higher; many districts expect to be insolvent within a couple of years, and some even sooner, if things don't change. But they say they're not going down without a fight.  Go to full article

New studies show NY school funding not meeting court order

It's been nearly ten years since New York's highest court ruled that the state needed to better fund schools, and an attorney who helped litigate that case says it may be time to head back to court on the issue.

Michael Rebell is director of the Campaign for Educational Equity at Columbia University's Teachers College. His group has just released two studies of "high needs" schools around the state, and found that they aren't meeting minimum state standards.  Go to full article
Franklin-Essex-Hamilton BOCES Superintendent Stephen Shafer, left, discusses superintendent search options with Saranac Lake school board members at the board's July 25 meeting. Photo courtesy of Adirondack Daily Entyerprise.
Franklin-Essex-Hamilton BOCES Superintendent Stephen Shafer, left, discusses superintendent search options with Saranac Lake school board members at the board's July 25 meeting. Photo courtesy of Adirondack Daily Entyerprise.

Tri Lakes schools consider sharing superintendents

As more school districts across the state are pressed to consider consolidation, there's a debate brewing in the Tri-Lakes about whether some of the area's school districts should consider sharing a single superintendent.

School officials in the area are open to talking about the possibility of sharing superintendents, but it's unclear whether there's enough momentum to move beyond the talking stage. The Saranac Lake and Lake Placid school boards are planning a joint meeting to discuss opportunities to share services later this month or in early September.

Chris Knight has our story. (Chris Morris contributed to this report.)  Go to full article
Banford Elementary School in Canton. Photo: Canton Central School
Banford Elementary School in Canton. Photo: Canton Central School

Elementary schools grapple with more mandates, fewer teachers

It may be summer, but school officials are already preparing for fall. And they need to this year; North Country schools already know they have a lot of changes ahead. With state budget cuts and a new cap on property tax increases, Canton Central School is cutting staff and trimming programs. The elementary school is losing a teacher at each grade level. At the same time, it's implementing new teacher evaluations and moving toward national academic standards for students. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
I think you'll see closure of schools. I think you'll see mergers of schools.

Many NY schools expect to use up savings in next 18 months

A new survey shows that many New York school districts are within a year and a half of exhausting their fund balances. School business leaders say that could lead to district consolidationsor closures. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
Students during Feburary lobbying effort in Albany.  (Photo: Carol Pynchon)
Students during Feburary lobbying effort in Albany. (Photo: Carol Pynchon)

Canton students reflect on advocacy effort, as they prepare to graduate

High school seniors are getting ready to graduate. For students in the A-P Government class at Canton Central, it's been a year of learning firsthand how government works. They got riled up when they learned that their school might need to eliminate things like sports and theatre, as well as jobs because of decisions in the state budget. So, they took action.

Along with a few hundred parents and school officials, they took a bus trip to Albany in February to lobby lawmakers. In the end, the state restored some money to Canton Central and other rural schools. However, the district still plans to cut programs, and more than 24 jobs.

Now that it's graduation time, the seniors have had a few months to reflect on their lobbying effort. We spoke with Susannah Sudborough and Pat McGaw who were both touched by the experience but came away with opposite conclusions about what it will mean for their own futures.

Our story was produced by Julie Grant and Natasha Haverty.  Go to full article
If the state is going to mandate, why don't they just do it?... just tell us where they want us to be, and let us work on getting there.

Strapped schools consider joining forces

Some North Country schools looking for ways to save money have started talking about merging or creating regional high schools.

Parents and school officials from Canton Central, Potsdam Central and other districts met with a representative from Governor Cuomo's office yesterday. They wanted to know what role the state would play in district mergers. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
Canton Central School. Photo: Lizette Haenel
Canton Central School. Photo: Lizette Haenel

With the state budget settled, schools must decide their budget plans

Now that north country schools have final budget numbers from the state, it's time to figure out where to cut. Canton Central Superintendent Bill Gregory says they picked up an additional $172,000 dollars in state budget negotiations. But that only covers 10% of the district's $2.5 million shortfall.  Go to full article
Students from Canton's AP Government class after an assembly to explain state aid cuts to other students.
Students from Canton's AP Government class after an assembly to explain state aid cuts to other students.

Canton students led the way to Albany advocacy trip

What started as a field trip for a Canton Central School Government class has become a live-issue that has busloads of students, parents, and school officials headed to Albany Wednesday.

They're worried that Governor Andrew Cuomo's proposal for school aid this year will mean huge cutbacks to their programs.

Cuomo has called himself the lobbyist for students. These were his comments during his budget proposal speech last month, talking about refocusing education on student needs, "This was not supposed to be about the adults, it was supposed to be about the children. It was supposed to be the best way to educate children, and respecting the tax dollar to do it."

Cuomo has proposed a 4.1% hike in education funding. But that still leaves Canton Central with a $2.5 million shortfall.

The students want the Governor to see how his budget is affecting kids in poor, rural districts. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
Newcomb's high school and middle school eats lunch together(Photos:  Brian Mann)
Newcomb's high school and middle school eats lunch together(Photos: Brian Mann)

A village school in the Adirondacks goes global to survive

Public schools in the North Country have been closing one-by-one for decades. It's a heartbreaking event for small towns.

But dwindling populations and rising costs have forced districts to consolidate and bus their kids long distances to bigger schools.

Incoming Governor Andrew Cuomo has indicated that he wants more districts to merge, and the state has already cut education funding.

The entire Newcomb school district has fewer than a hundred kids.

But as Brian Mann reports, the community is fighting for survival by trying to attract international students to fill its empty classrooms.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 20