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News stories tagged with "new-york-state"

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New York showed improvement in all eight categories of health and education for children. Photo: <a href="http://datacenter.kidscount.org/~/media/381/AECF_KC_DS_GLR-image04_620x494.jpg">Annie E. Casey Foundation</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York showed improvement in all eight categories of health and education for children. Photo: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY ranks among top 5 states for kids' health

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York ranks among the top five states for children's health, according to the 25th edition of the Kids Count Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The report released Tuesday looks at data from 1990 that show the major trends in child well-being, and recent trends that compare data from 2005 to 2012.  Go to full article

DiNapoli: I won't be "sacrificial lamb" on campaign finance reform

New York state comptroller Tom DiNapoli says he won't be participating in a new pilot public campaign finance program agreed to in the state budget, and government reform groups say, they don't blame him.

Saying he won't be a "convenient sacrificial lamb", DiNapoli says he won't opt in to a test system for public campaign finance that applies only to his office, and would use money from the comptroller's unclaimed funds to pay for it.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/22007612@N05/5440995682/">Gage Skidmore</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Gage Skidmore, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Trump, considering NY gov's race, to head upstate

BUFFALO, N.Y. AP) Donald Trump, who says he'd consider a run for New York governor, is scheduled to head upstate to attend a Republican fundraiser.

The Erie County Republican Committee says Trump will be at its Lincoln Leadership Award event in Buffalo on Jan. 31.  Go to full article
An Amish farm in St. Lawrence county. Photo: Sarah Harris
An Amish farm in St. Lawrence county. Photo: Sarah Harris

Why more Amish aren't registering for the STAR exemption, and how it's getting fixed

New York state is urging people to re-register for their STAR property tax exemption before the deadline of December 31. Even if you've done it before, you need to sign up again - it's part of an effort by the state to curb fraud.

You can register online or by phone (here's how), but what if you don't have a computer or a phone? What if, say, you're Amish?  Go to full article
Registration for the STAR exemption, by county. Image: tax.ny.gov
Registration for the STAR exemption, by county. Image: tax.ny.gov

Why you have to register (again) for the STAR exemption

New York state is putting out the word that if you want your STAR Property Tax exemption to continue, you need to register. If you're a homeowner, you probably already know that: The state has, according to a press release, sent letters to all of the nearly 2.7 million homeowners who claimed the exemption last year. But if you've already claimed the exemption, why do you need to register again?  Go to full article

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Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) hold a press conference in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann
Gun rights activist Richard Mack (L) and Clinton County Sheriff David Favro (R) hold a press conference in Plattsburgh, opposing the New York SAFE Act. Photo: Brian Mann

Will upstate NY cops, sheriffs enforce gun control laws?

New York's tough gun law, known as the SAFE Act, was pushed through last January by Governor Andrew Cuomo, winning support from the Democratic Assembly and the Republican-controlled Senate.

Over the last six months, however, political opposition to the law has grown, especially in upstate counties where gun ownership is popular. A growing number of law enforcement officials, especially county sheriffs, now say they're deeply troubled by the law, which bans assault rifles and large ammunition clips. Some officers say they won't actively enforce the SAFE Act.  Go to full article
Inside the Capitol, twists and turns lead to the passage of many laws. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/54021469@N00/394233312/">Holley St. Germain</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Inside the Capitol, twists and turns lead to the passage of many laws. Photo: Holley St. Germain, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

How the $#%@# does a bill become a law in NYS?

As New York's legislative session wraps up this week, some of the major issues we've been hearing about for the last while remain unresolved, and it's looking like at least some of them aren't going to get resolved in this session.

Of course bills often come together and pass the legislature at the last moment, so what's going to happen in the next couple days is anyone's guess. But how is all of this happening? Turns out it's much more complicated, and less transparent, than what you might remember from Schoolhouse Rock.  Go to full article
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

NYS DEC cuts complicate fracking picture

Proponents and opponents of hydrofracking in New York state read Gov. Andrew Cuomo's budget closely for clues about fracking's future in the state.

They didn't see much. A decision on whether fracking will be allowed is expected after a health study is complete in February.

The agency overseeing the review, and in charge of permitting should fracking get the go-ahead, is New York's Department of Environmental Conservation. And it's in for a cut of five and a half percent in Cuomo's new budget.  Go to full article

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