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News stories tagged with "newcomb"

DEC Commissioner Joe Martens hauls a canoe over one of the carry trails between the Essex Chain Lakes.  Photo:  Brian Mann
DEC Commissioner Joe Martens hauls a canoe over one of the carry trails between the Essex Chain Lakes. Photo: Brian Mann

New to explore in the Adirondacks: the Essex Chain Lakes

This is the final week for public comment on the new management plan for the Essex Chain Lakes in the central Adirondacks.

The 11,000-acre chunk of wild forest and lakes near the town of Newcomb is part of the massive Finch Pruyn conservation deal that has expanded the Park's public land.

State officials are hoping the Essex Chain will offer a popular new alternative for paddlers and hikers and anglers, drawing more visitors to a part of the Park that often sees little traffic.

Our Adirondack bureau chief Brian Mann made the trip last week and has our story.  Go to full article
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.

Ready, set, count! BioBlitz starts Sunday morning in Newcomb

Visitors to the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb on Sunday will get a close-up look at wildlife. The annual BioBlitz is a one-day, rapid inventory of animal and plant life. Professional biologists will join citizen scientists to study and catalog wildlife in the Adirondacks, including salamanders, bees, mushrooms and wildflowers.

Todd Moe spoke with Ezra Schwartzberg about the expert-led species inventory teams that will discover, count, map, and learn about the park's biodiversity along lakeshores, marshes and forests.  Go to full article
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb.  Photo: Paul Hai
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb. Photo: Paul Hai

Newcomb season starts with loons and logs on Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its third rubber loon race on Saturday. It's an opportunity to get outside, rain or shine, and connect with nature. Other activities will include a bird walk, a presentation on "plein air" art by Artist-in-Residence Frances Gaffney, and Windy Baker will lead an Adirondack chair building workshop.

The art and outdoors events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's third year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb.  Photo: Paul Hai
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb. Photo: Paul Hai

Newcomb season starts with loons and logs on Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its third rubber loon race on Saturday. It's an opportunity to get outside, rain or shine, and connect with nature. Other activities will include a bird walk, a presentation on "plein air" art by Artist-in-Residence Frances Gaffney, and Windy Baker will lead an Adirondack chair building workshop.

The art and outdoors events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's third year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article

Loons and logs in Newcomb Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its second rubber loon race and the return of a 100-year-old Adirondack guide boat on Saturday.

The two events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's second annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's second year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
From left, Newcomb Central School Superintendent Skip Hults, Rep. Bill Owens, Senior Class Advisor Martha Swan, the senior class and School Board President Steve Frieman (photo by Andy Flynn)
From left, Newcomb Central School Superintendent Skip Hults, Rep. Bill Owens, Senior Class Advisor Martha Swan, the senior class and School Board President Steve Frieman (photo by Andy Flynn)

Owens lauds international program at Newcomb graduation

The Newcomb Central School District in the Adirondacks celebrated a big milestone this week. It boosted its enrollment to 101 students. That may not seem like a lot, but considering the school had only 55 students five years ago, topping 100 is a big deal. The turnaround began after Superintendent Skip Hults began accepting foreign exchange students.

These students get a uniquely Adirondack education, the locals get more diversity and Newcomb Central fills classrooms. The program caught the attention of Congressman Bill Owens, who was the commencement speaker at Newcomb on Saturday, June 23. Andy Flynn has our story.  Go to full article

Logging, rubber loon race in Newcomb

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb will try a new twist on the "rubber duck race" on Saturday, using rubber loons instead. The event is part of the center's celebration of its first anniversary under the leadership of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. Proceeds will support educational programs at the center.

The event will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Visitor's center program coordinator Paul Hai told Todd Moe that a California company, CelebriDucks, manufactured the rubber loons for the race.  Go to full article
Tzipporah Marks-Barnett. Source: Facebook
Tzipporah Marks-Barnett. Source: Facebook

Tzipporah Marks-Barnett: A passion for telling stories

The Newcomb United Methodist Church will host an afternoon of words and music this Sunday at 3:30 pm. California storyteller Tzipporah Marks-Barnett is one of the presenters who will share her love of telling tales. She's an ordained Jewish storyteller, who joins a long tradition of sharing stories, many with messages and life lessons.

Here, she tells a Hassidic tale of love titled, A Generous Wife. Todd Moe spoke with Marks-Barnett and asked about her journey to becoming an ordained storyteller.  Go to full article
Paul Hai and SUNY's CESF have brought the Newcomb VIC back from the brink (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Paul Hai and SUNY's CESF have brought the Newcomb VIC back from the brink (Photo: Brian Mann)

Education, conversation at Newcomb center

The Adirondack Park's visitor interpretive centers are open again this summer, despite the APA's decision last year to eliminate their funding. Keeping the two centers open, at Paul Smiths and in Newcomb, required complicated negotiations through the winter and new partnerships.

Now the two projects have emerged with very different approaches and goals. Yesterday, Nora Flaherty reported on the private effort to revitalize the VIC at Paul Smiths. This morning, Brian Mann has the story of the VIC in Newcomb, where the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry hopes to use the facility as a new meeting ground for education and conversation.  Go to full article
Newcomb's high school and middle school eats lunch together(Photos:  Brian Mann)
Newcomb's high school and middle school eats lunch together(Photos: Brian Mann)

A village school in the Adirondacks goes global to survive

Public schools in the North Country have been closing one-by-one for decades. It's a heartbreaking event for small towns.

But dwindling populations and rising costs have forced districts to consolidate and bus their kids long distances to bigger schools.

Incoming Governor Andrew Cuomo has indicated that he wants more districts to merge, and the state has already cut education funding.

The entire Newcomb school district has fewer than a hundred kids.

But as Brian Mann reports, the community is fighting for survival by trying to attract international students to fill its empty classrooms.  Go to full article

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