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News stories tagged with "nuclear-power"

Nine Mie Point Unit 2 reactor. Source: USNRC
Nine Mie Point Unit 2 reactor. Source: USNRC

Nine Mile 2 reactor still shut down following leak

The Nine Mile Point Unit 2 reactor on Lake Ontario is still closed after a leakage in a containment structure the weekend. The reactor shut down this weekend after a "higher-than-normal leakage" was discovered inside the facility's drywell, the containment structure that surrounds the reactor vessel and associated piping.  Go to full article
Too close for comfort?  A family watches as a ship passes through the Massena locks (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Too close for comfort? A family watches as a ship passes through the Massena locks (Photo: Brian Mann)

Is the St. Lawrence Seaway safe for nuclear shipments?

The Canadian company that wants to ship radioactive waste through the St. Lawrence Seaway has put the project on hold while it schedules talks with Mohawk and other native groups in Canada.

The project, first proposed by Bruce Power last year, has sparked controversy on both sides of the border. The project has also sparked new questions about other kinds of hazardous cargos that are passing through the locks and channels of the St. Lawrence River. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Oswego County wants more nuclear power plants like this one on the shore of Lake Ontario (Source:  Wikipedia)
Oswego County wants more nuclear power plants like this one on the shore of Lake Ontario (Source: Wikipedia)

Japan crisis could derail North Country's nuclear dreams

As we've been hearing through the morning, the nuclear crisis in Japan continues to spiral out of control.

Until this week, that country's safety record has been cited by nuclear power advocates who want to build more plants here in upstate New York.

Many local leaders say they still think a nuclear plant could safely boost the region's economy.

And New York Senator Chuck Schumer, speaking on "Meet the Press," said on Sunday that the unfolding catastrophe hasn't changed his mind about nuclear power.

"The bottom line is that we do have to free ourselves...from foreign oil in the other half of the globe," Schumer said.

"So I'm still willing to look at nuclear. As I've always said, it has to be done safely and carefully."

But supporters of nuclear power acknowledge that the disaster in Japan will make it far more difficult to gain approval for new projects in New York state any time soon.

Brian Mann has our special report.  Go to full article
Vermont Yankee plant (Source:  Wikipedia)
Vermont Yankee plant (Source: Wikipedia)

Nuclear crisis comes as Vermont debates its nuclear future

The crisis in Japan is unfolding just as Vermont's legislature is debating the future of Entergy's Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant.

That 39-year-old plant has faced troubles of its own, including the discovery last year that it was leaking a substance called tritium into the groundwater.

Just last week, the Federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission gave Vermont Yankee approval to operate for another two decades.

But the disaster in Japan is sparking new opposition among state lawmakers.

Brian Mann spoke with Shay Totten, a reporter and columnist for the weekly magazine "Seven Days" based in Burlington.  Go to full article

Terrorist Threat to Nuclear Power Plants

After the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, there have been all kinds of speculation about the next target. One of the worst case scenarios conjured up is crashing a jet into a nuclear power plant. Since September 11th, the nuclear power industry and regulators have been trying to determine what other kinds of threats the plants might face. However, progress has been slow. No one seems sure how far to take the security issue. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

Canada Debates Revival Of Nuclear Power

At a recent meeting in Detroit, the G-8 energy ministers were looking for alternatives to non-renewable resources such as oil and gas. Nuclear energy was high on that list of alternatives. But as the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Dan Karpenchuk reports, on the north shore of Lake Ontario, at least, renewing the drive towards nuclear power is becoming too costly.  Go to full article

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