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News stories tagged with "o-donoghue"

Comet Panstarrs was first observed from Hawaii in June 2011. Image: <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZlenAvqLCI">ScienceAtNASA</a>
Comet Panstarrs was first observed from Hawaii in June 2011. Image: ScienceAtNASA

Dust off the binoculars: Comet Panstarrs cometh

The days are lengthening, but there's still plenty to see in the night sky. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue joins Todd Moe to talk about the Snow Moon, the meteor that landed in Russia and Comet Panstarrs on the horizon.  Go to full article

A summer sky of stars

Next Tuesday's solstice is usually taken as the beginning of summer in our region. The days are at their longest, but the short nights still remain awash with bright stars and planets. Todd Moe talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about the Summer Solstice, Saturn and the early summer night sky.  Go to full article
A Perseid meteor streaks across Springfield, Vermont's early morning sky. (photo: Sky and Telescope)
A Perseid meteor streaks across Springfield, Vermont's early morning sky. (photo: Sky and Telescope)

The night sky during the "Dog Days of Summer"

On clear nights, there's always something to see when you look up. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue joins Todd Moe in the studio to talk about what's up in the night sky during the Dog Days of Summer. Venus is a bright evening star, while Jupiter is the brightest star-like point in the morning sky.  Go to full article

The night sky and what about 2012?

St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue talks with Martha Foley about the sky above us, and what 2012 may really bring.  Go to full article

What's up in the February night sky

If you can brave cold, crisp weather, there are plenty of treasures for stargazers in the February night sky -- Mars, Jupiter and the constellation Orion. Todd Moe talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about what's up in the night sky these days.  Go to full article

Happy full blue moon!

Above the clouds, a blue moon will shine tonight to usher in the new year for the first time in 20 years. A blue moon is when there are two full moons in a month. Todd Moe talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about a rarer blue moon on New Year's Eve.  Go to full article

A look up at the night sky

Look up tonight and you'll likely see a sky full of stars and a waxing new moon. Martha Foley talks with astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue to get us oriented to the late summer sky.  Go to full article

A heads-up on the night sky

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence University physics professor and astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about star gazing in late fall and early winter - Mars in the evening sky and Venus before dawn.  Go to full article
Venus in the southeast morning sky. (Graphic image from Space.com)
Venus in the southeast morning sky. (Graphic image from Space.com)

Autumn sky: less daylight, more planets visible

St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue and Martha Foley talk about the autumn sky - from Venus in the morning to the waning crescent moon.  Go to full article

December?s night sky and the solstice

Martha Foley talks with St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue about the winter sky and solstice.  Go to full article

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