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News stories tagged with "oneida-county"

Outside the "Thirsty Otter," in Forestport.
Outside the "Thirsty Otter," in Forestport.

Forestport Poker Run: the outlaw spirit, for a good cause

In the 1890s the town of Forestport in the southern Adirondacks was a rowdy logging town. The joke was there were more saloons than people. And no saloon had more of a reputation than the Hotel Doyle. When the paper mills started to shut down, it was at the Hotel Doyle that the townspeople hatched a plan to sabotage one of the levees on the Black River Canal. Three times they succeeded, each time bringing repair crews - and economic life - back to the region. Today the Hotel Doyle still stands. It's a biker bar called Scooter's. Gregory Warner went there last month for a poker run - kind of like bar hopping for charity on motorcycles. But as he found out, the poker run is about more than beer and wheels. It's another example of Forestport refusing to fade away.  Go to full article
Outside the "Thirsty Otter," in Forestport.
Outside the "Thirsty Otter," in Forestport.

Forestport Poker Run: the outlaw spirit, for a good cause

In the 1890s the town of Forestport in the southern Adirondacks was a rowdy logging town. The joke was there were more saloons than people. And no saloon had more of a reputation than the Hotel Doyle. When the paper mills started to shut down, it was at the Hotel Doyle that the townspeople hatched a plan to sabotage one of the levees on the Black River Canal. Three times they succeeded, each time bringing repair crews - and economic life - back to the region. Today the Hotel Doyle still stands. It's a biker bar called Scooter's. Gregory Warner went there last month for a poker run - kind of like bar hopping for charity on motorcycles. But as he found out, the poker run is about more than beer and wheels. It's another example of Forestport refusing to fade away.  Go to full article

A family tree leads to lawbreakers in Forestport

This weekend the tiny town of Forestport, southeast of Boonville, is celebrating its past - the history of a boozy, brawling town of outlaws. At the end of the 19th century, town leaders sabotaged the Forestport feeder canal, a part of the Erie Canal system, not once, not twice, but three times. At the time, it was called "the most damnable conspiracy" in the history of the state of New York. It was the stuff of whispered rumors and legend in Oneida County, until an amateur geneologist and career journalist stumbled into the heart of the conspiracy. David Sommerstein has the story behind Michael Doyle's book, The Forestport Breaks.  Go to full article

Griffo, Julian face off for 47th Senate District

Two Republicans are vying for their party's support to replace departing State Senator Ray Meier for the 47th District. Joseph Griffo faces off against Timothy Julian in tomorrow's primary. The race pits a well-endorsed political veteran against a relative newcomer. Gregory Warner reports. The Democratic primary for the 47th State Senate district also features two Utica-area candidates. Attorney Leon Koziol is a former Utica city councilman. John Murad is a retired state Supreme Court Judge. Koziol has the endorsements of Democratic Commitees in Oneida and St. Lawrence County. He'll also appear on the Working Families party line. According to the Watertown Daily Times, Koziol has called the North Country "the neglected part of the district". He's pushing for better health care for farmers. And he wants the New York Power Authority to transfer to private hands more land along the St. Lawrence River. Murad will only appear on the Democratic line. He's called for reform in Albany, including an overhaul of New York's workers' compensation system. Murad also wants to boost funding for tourism in Lewis and St. Lawrence counties.  Go to full article

Moderate Boehlert Not Seeking Another Term

North Country Congressman Sherwood Boehlert announced Friday that he won't run again. The Republican from Oneida County served in Washington for more than 24 years. He proudly describes himself as "a moderate". This change could bring a major shake-up in the region's Republican Party. State Senator Ray Meier has been mentioned as a possible replacement. This move also offers Democrats a chance to pick off a traditionally Republican district. Martha Foley talks with Brian Mann about Boehlert's resignation.  Go to full article
Testing at the DEC's checkpoint.
Testing at the DEC's checkpoint.

Hunters Frustrated at Deer Disease Checkpoint

Rifle hunting season opened last weekend across the North Country. It's the first fall since chronic wasting disease - a fatal deer illness - was discovered in 7 deer in Oneida County in April. Most of New York's hunters are taking the development in stride. The Department of Environmental Conservation says hunting licenses are on par with last year. But in the area where the diseased deer were found, hunters are frustrated. Some are angry. They have to obey new regulations, including taking their deer to a state-run checkpoint for testing. David Sommerstein went there and has this report.  Go to full article

In Potsdam, State Spreads Word on CWD

The Department of Environmental Conservation held a meeting on chronic wasting disease in Potsdam last night. It's one in a series around the state to inform hunters about the fatal deer illness. CWD was discovered in 5 captive deer and 2 wild deer in central New York last spring. It was the first time the disease was discovered east of Wisconsin. As David Sommerstein reports, the turnout last night seems to indicate hunters aren't too worried.  Go to full article

Deer Disease Spreads to Wild

State officials said yesterday a wild deer in Oneida County has preliminarily tested positive for chronic wasting disease. It's the first time the fatal sickness has turned up in the wild in New York. The DEC is putting in place emergency containment measures by the end of the week. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
An elk with CWD.  Photo by Dr. Beth Williams, University of Wyoming, courtesy of CWD Alliance.
An elk with CWD. Photo by Dr. Beth Williams, University of Wyoming, courtesy of CWD Alliance.

Officials Fight Odds to Stop Chronic Wasting Disease

State officials are trying to prevent the spread of chronic wasting disease, or CWD, a fatal neurological disorder in deer and elk. It's thought to be transmitted through the animals' brain and spinal cord tissue. But there are no known links to illness in humans. Two farm-raised deer in Oneida County have tested positive for the disease. It's the first time CWD's been found east of Illinois. One of the deer was served at a sportsmens' dinner in the town of Verona. Officials are scrambling to keep the disease from spreading among New York's one million wild white-tailed deer. But as David Sommerstein reports, their cause may be an uphill battle.  Go to full article

CWD - Lessons from Wisconsin

People in Wisconsin have lived with concerns about chronic wasting disease since the first case surfaced there over two years ago. It was found in a wild deer. So far, some 460 animals have tested positive for the disease. People still hunt...and they still eat wild and domestic venison. Gil Halsted is a reporter for Wisconsin Public Radio. He's followed the story since that first case. He spoke with Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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