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News stories tagged with "ontario"

Site plan for the Lost Villages Museum in Ault Park, Ontario
Site plan for the Lost Villages Museum in Ault Park, Ontario

Heard up North: "Inundation Day"

So, what's it like to watch your town go underwater? Gregory Warner spoke with Jane Craig. She's director of the "Lost Villages Museum" in Ault (ALT) Park, Ontario. It's a museum for the 10 Canadian villages lost on July 1st, 1958, "Inundation Day," when the hydrodams went up and the Seaway expanded. It's kind of a theme park where you can find the actual buildings rescued from the villages. There's a working general store, log cabin, barber shop, schoolhouse, resource centre, blacksmith shop, corn crib, railway station and church. If anyone was mourning the loss it would seem to be Jane Craig. But she says it was kind of exciting.  Go to full article

Tales from a bird sale

Bird fanciers gathered in Manotick, Ontario for a Fall bird sale recently. Lucy Martin stopped by. She spoke with Barbara Schaffer of North Gower, young Marissa of Amherst Island, near Kingston, and an anonymous observer with a cautionary tale about the reponsibilities of pet ownership.  Go to full article
Patricia Towne (r) and Ann Fillhart
Patricia Towne (r) and Ann Fillhart

StoryCorps: Growing up Non-Native American among the Mohawks

StoryCorps is an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. Each week NCPR brings you a story from StoryCorps' visit to the North Country earlier this summer. This week Patricia Towne, who now lives in Florida, talks with her daughter Ann Fillhart from Lacona, New York.  Go to full article

Quilter for life

Hobbies make life richer, and you're never too old, or too young, to find one that's right for you. Donna James swapped a classroom full of 8th graders for a new world of fabric, patterns and needles. Her only regret is not taking it up sooner. At a recent quilt show in Manotick, Ontario, she explains why she loves quilting.  Go to full article

Serendipity on the St. Lawrence

Before our weather turns too cool -- one more trip out on the St. Lawrence River. Todd Moe visits photographer Ian Coristine on Raleigh Island, his seasonal home, for a chat about his latest book of photographs. River residents and visitors have probably seen Coristine aloft in his red ultralight aircraft searching the Thousand Islands for the perfect photo.  Go to full article
James Smith sculpts the statue of St. Lawrence
James Smith sculpts the statue of St. Lawrence

Statue honors St. Lawrence River's namesake

Many boaters ply the St. Lawrence, but few likely have a clue who St. Lawrence was. Todd Moe has the story of the third century Spanish saint and a new statue in his honor unveiled this month in Ontario.  Go to full article
Pat Johnson live on <i>The Blue Note</i> in 2003
Pat Johnson live on The Blue Note in 2003

Preview: Canadian bluesman Pat Johnson

Pat Johnson is one of eastern Ontario's busiest musicians, and he's marking the release of his second solo CD with a couple of special music events later this week. Joel Hurd has a preview.  Go to full article
Sheep dog portrait by artist Michael Walker
Sheep dog portrait by artist Michael Walker

Kingston hosts sheep dog trials

Some of North America's best herding dogs will be in Kingston this weekend for the 19th annual Sheep Dog Trials. It's a competitive dog sport in which dogs move sheep around a field, fences, gates, or enclosures as directed by their handlers. More than a hundred dogs have been registered for the Kingston event. This weekend's trials are the largest of their kind in Canada and attract a number of local, national and North American champion sheep dogs. Todd Moe talks with the trainer of the current North American champion.  Go to full article
From left: mill manager Isabelle Geoffrion, Lucy Martin, and senior miller Mike Maguire.
From left: mill manager Isabelle Geoffrion, Lucy Martin, and senior miller Mike Maguire.

Volunteers keep Watson's Mill alive

Watson's Mill is one of many postcard-pretty Ontario destinations. It opened for business in 1860 on the Rideau River in Manotick. It's still the town's main landmark. In their time, water-powered mills represented a high degree of technical sophistication. They still serve as fascinating reminders of how--and where--settlements took hold along North America's rivers. Watson's Mill comes alive in the summer -- full of the noise of water, turbines, grindstones, and people. Lucy Martin followed two modern enthusiasts who help keep it all turning.  Go to full article

On Horseback, for Body and Spirit

Therapeutic riding programs put children and adults who might otherwise never get their feet into stirrups on horseback. It's fun -- with a purpose. The skills needed to ride -- even the movement of the horse itself -- all have therapeutic value for people with physical or mental disabilities. Lucy Martin visited the Therapeutic Riding Association of Ottawa-Carleton, called "TROtt", in Greely, Ontario.  Go to full article

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