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News stories tagged with "outdoor-furnace"

Outdoor furnace owners came to tell the DEC to leave them alone
Outdoor furnace owners came to tell the DEC to leave them alone

Residents slam new outdoor furnace rules

More than a hundred people came to the Department of Environmental Conservation's first public hearing last night in Watertown about outdoor wood furnaces. The DEC says the boilers are a significant source of air pollution and have never been regulated. It wants owners to replace old furnaces within ten years and erect higher chimneys to keep smoke away from neighbors. But the message in the room was nearly unanimous. People said the new rules are a major government intrusion and should be scrapped. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
[photo: DEC]
[photo: DEC]

Outdoor furnace rules make current owners fume

Outdoor wood furnaces have become increasingly popular across the North Country. They can save homeowners more than a thousand dollars a year on heating costs. But they've also become a bigger source of air pollution and complaints from neighbors. The Department of Environmental Conservation wants to impose new regulations on outdoor furnaces. They include rules on boiler efficiency, chimney height, and what can be burned inside. As David Sommerstein reports, a provision to force owners to replace existing furnaces may be the most controversial.  Go to full article
Outdoor wood furnace in operation. Source: Washington State Dept. of Ecology
Outdoor wood furnace in operation. Source: Washington State Dept. of Ecology

Outdoor furnaces taking the heat

Winter seems a long way off. But with the price of home heating oil and natural gas expected to continue to soar, North Country residents are already scrambling for cheaper ways to stay warm. Outdoor wood furnaces are an increasingly popular alternative because they can burn most any kind of wood. But tonight in Jefferson County, the village of Sackets Harbor may join a growing number of communities to restrict or ban them. As David Sommerstein reports, the smoke from outdoor furnaces can bother neighbors and pose a risk to human health and the environment.  Go to full article

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