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News stories tagged with "outdoor-recreation"

Blue Mountain Lake. Archive Photo of the Day: Laurie Dirkx
Blue Mountain Lake. Archive Photo of the Day: Laurie Dirkx

This weekend in the Adirondacks

John Warren from the Adirondack Almanack looks at outdoor recreation conditions around the Adirondacks each weekend.

Drier weather this week has kept the fire danger elevated, and dried most trails, although some low-lying areas remain wet and muddy, especially in the Western Adirondacks.

Rivers and streams around the Adirondack Park have returned to normal for this time of year.  Go to full article
Black bear in the Adirondacks. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/thewildcenter/6266737728/">The Wild Center</a>, Creative Commons some rights reserved
Black bear in the Adirondacks. Photo: The Wild Center, Creative Commons some rights reserved

NY officials give tips to keep away nuisance bears

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York state environmental officials are offering some tips to keep away nuisance bears during camping season.

Black bears generally avoid people, but they are notorious for taking advantage of any available food source.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/amjs_photos/1267670128/">Axizor</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Axizor, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Moose spotted wandering in Lake George area

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (AP) State wildlife experts say a young moose that has been wandering through populated areas in northeastern New York is likely looking for his own place to hang out.

Ed Reed, a regional wildlife manager, tells The Post-Star of Glens Falls that the male moose may have been pushed out of another territory by an older bull moose. Reed says the young moose apparently is looking for his own territory.  Go to full article
Asha Patel, an immunology researcher, uses a Burkard Spore Trap to collect pollen on the roof of Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh. Photo: Julie Grant
Asha Patel, an immunology researcher, uses a Burkard Spore Trap to collect pollen on the roof of Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh. Photo: Julie Grant

Climate change adds sneezes for allergy sufferers

If even hearing the word "ragweed" makes your eyes water, you might be one of the nearly 45 million Americans with seasonal allergies. Or you might be, next year.

Allergists say the number of people with sensitivities to ragweed and other plants is growing. Julie Grant looks at how climate change is fueling the rise in allergies and asthma.  Go to full article
Spiny water fleas. Photo: National Park Service
Spiny water fleas. Photo: National Park Service

Gunky, icky spiny water flea spreads in Adirondacks

Scientists and activists studying invasive species say the spiny water flea is spreading to more lakes in the Adirondack Park.

The organism had already been found in Great Sacandaga and Lake George. This summer, the invasive creature was found in Lake Pleasant and Piseco Lake.  Go to full article
Freshwater drum. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/noaa_glerl/4045950503/">NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory </a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Freshwater drum. Photo: NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory , Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Fisherman reels in record drum on Lake Ontario

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A fisherman from western New York has been credited with catching a record-breaking freshwater drum in Lake Ontario.

The state Department of Environmental Conservation says James VanArsdall of West Henrietta caught the fish in Irondequoit Bay in Monroe County on June 14. The fish measured 33.5 inches and weighed 26 pounds 9 ounces.  Go to full article
Is there a pond out there calling you to cool off? Brian Mann in Bone Pond. Photo: Brian Mann
Is there a pond out there calling you to cool off? Brian Mann in Bone Pond. Photo: Brian Mann

Adirondack Summer 101: Pond swimming!

One of our Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann's assignments is to bring details of his beat to the larger regional audience. So we can forgive him when he turns a long lunch hour into a chance to bag a new pond for a cooling swim - especially if we get some vicarious enjoyment out of it. On a hot, muggy day last July, he sent this quick postcard from Bone Pond, near Tupper Lake. Today seems like a perfect day to go there again.  Go to full article
On Camelot Island. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/midnightlounge/157504297/">Jason Roberts</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
On Camelot Island. Photo: Jason Roberts, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Thousand Islands controlled burn will protect rare pitch pines

MALLORYTOWN, Ont. - Parks Canada is to start a controlled blaze today in Ontario's Thousand Islands National Park to help protect rare fire-dependent species. It says a 16-member team will descend on Camelot Island to set fire to an area of just over one hectare that is home to about 50 pitch pine trees.

The fire will help them regenerate and open the canopy, giving more light for seedlings to grow. The federal agency says years of fire suppression has upset the balance of natural and essential processes needed to support healthy mixed forests in the park.  Go to full article
Rafting the Hudson River. Photo: Beaver Brook Outfitters
Rafting the Hudson River. Photo: Beaver Brook Outfitters

Recreational projects funded for Adirondacks

INDIAN LAKE, N.Y. (AP) Gov. Andrew Cuomo has announced funding for several projects to expand and improve outdoor recreation in the Adirondacks.

The Town of Indian Lake will receive $750,000 to repair and upgrade the Lake Abanakee Dam on the Indian River to bring the dam into compliance with state dam safety regulations. The upgrade will also allow continued water releases from the dam for rafters who paddle down the Indian River into the Hudson River.  Go to full article
Mark Ellis in front of his camera obscura. Photo: Sarah Harris
Mark Ellis in front of his camera obscura. Photo: Sarah Harris

Capturing the North Country, one pinhole photo at a time

Say you want to take a picture. You whip out your smart phone or your digital camera, take a bunch of shots. Maybe you add a filter or dress it up in photoshop. We've gotten accustomed to taking lots of photos fast.

But Saranac Lake photographer Mark Ellis is interested in slower, older methods of photography. He's a master of the pinhole camera and he has a giant camera obscura in his front yard.  Go to full article

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